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Your Journey to Plant Parenthood

Empowering all people to be plant people — a collection of articles from Geoponics’s team of Plant Experts across a variety of plant care topics to inspire confidence in the next generation of plant parents. Welcome to Plant Parenthood™.


How to Bring Your Plants Indoors for the Fall and Winter

Once the sunny days of summer are behind us and we begin to adjust to lower light all around (goodbye, daylight saving time), it’s time to bring our outdoor plants inside. If you brought your sun-loving plants outside, you already know that there are factors to keep in mind to successfully transition your plants’ environment. When bringing your plants back inside, there are a few steps to make sure your plants stay happy and healthy, and that you protect your already happy indoor plants. Inspection Before bringing any houseplants back indoors, be sure to thoroughly inspect them. When plants are left outdoors, they become more susceptible to pests and disease, so you want to make sure to remove the risk of spreading those to the rest of your plants! Check the stems, the tops and undersides of the leaves, as well as the nooks and crevices of certain plants, since that’s where pests like to hide. Prune and Treat If you do find that your plant has pests, remove any heavily infested material, and treat the plant as needed based on the pest at hand. To determine which pest you have and follow specific treatment plans for each type, head to our pests identification blog. If you notice a fungal infection, we recommend removing any infected leaves to prevent it from spreading, and sterilize any tools that come into contact with the plants. Any lackluster or damaged foliage that has succumbed to heavy wind drag or unfavorable conditions can be pruned off the plant to enhance the appearance, and help the plant focus energy on new growth. Leaf cleaning will also be beneficial if there are hard mineral deposits, dust, or debris on the foliage, which block the chlorophyll from absorbing light. Quarantine Once your plants are inspected, pruned, and groomed, you can integrate them back into your home. We recommend quarantining them for a period of 1-2 weeks inside and away from the rest of your collection because pests can be very small (sometimes even microscopic), so at times even after treatment then can pop up again shortly after treatment. Even if you don’t notice pests initially, their eggs could be dormant in the soil and hatch indoors. Inspect Again After the plants have quarantined and acclimated to your home, you should inspect the plants one last time to ensure pests or disease haven’t resurfaced. Prune and treat again if needed. For plants that are good to go, consider refreshing the soil and upgrade in container size if needed. Assimilate Plants Once your plants are cleared from quarantine and are looking refreshed, you can assimilate them into the rest of your indoor jungle! Be sure to follow up with the proper care, including its preferred sunlight and watering conditions. |


by Plant Club | 20 November, 2020 |

Arabian Coffee Tree Indoors (Coffea arabica)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features The Arabian coffee tree is the world’s primary source of coffee beans. This tree is native to Ethiopia but the popularity of coffee, and demand for beans, has resulted in growing operations throughout the world. Coffee trees produce big, glossy, beautiful foliage and make excellent houseplants for bright locations. Plants are not likely to bloom and produce beans when grown as a houseplant. They can also be grown in the ground or large patio planters outdoors in temperate climates. Uses A great potted plant for a sunny spot indoors or on a lightly shaded deck, patio, or porch during warm weather. A lovely landscape plant for warm, frost-free climates. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Thrives in a warm location with bright, indirect light. Keep soil consistently moist. Can be pruned freely to maintain desired size. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 1-6' (0.3-1.8m) Space Range: 2-3' (0.6-0.9m) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 80°F (4° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Dracaena, Dieffenbachia, Aglaonema USDA Zone: 10-11 |


by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Why you need plants in your life

Polka Dot Plant

How to Grow Hypoestes Phyllostachya (Polka Dot Plant) Indoors The polka dot plant is a lively and beautiful little plant with brightly spotted leaves that stand out especially well against other plants. Put them in a mass of ferns or ivies, and their colors will stand out in bright contrast. The most common polka dot plant on the market is the pink polka dot, but in recent years growers have introduced new varieties in colors such as white or red. They've also developed plants with deeper colors and brighter contrast, so your plants will pop even more Polka dot plants are not especially difficult to grow, but their main drawback is their relatively short lifespan. After flowering, the plant will likely become dormant or die outright. As a result, it's best to buy new ones every spring or attempt to propagate a new plant. Be warned: propagation isn't easy or very fast. Growing Conditions Light: Bright light is best. Plants grown in poor light conditions are likely to have solid green leaves, which defeats the purpose of this neat little plant. If your plant isn't colorful enough, consider some direct sunlight, which should deepen the colors. Water: Keep the soil moist in the summer growing season and reduce watering in the winter. If your plant flowers and then goes into a dormant phase, reduce water significantly and resume regular watering only after the new growth emerges. This plant prefers humid conditions, so you can mist its leaves or place its pot on a tray of pebbles filled with water to maintain high humidity. Fertilizer: During the growing season, feed weekly with a weak liquid fertilizer that includes micro utrients and encourages blooming. Soil: A light, fast-draining potting soil is perfect. You can use fortified soils. Propagation of Polka Dot Plants Polka dot plants can be grown either from seed or cuttings. If you are starting from seeds, sow the seeds indoors in early spring under lights and pinch out the weaker seedlings. Provide them with ample moisture and bright light to develop the best color. You can also start them from stem tip cuttings, but this perhaps isn't the best option. They are slow to root, so use rooting hormone, and be patient. Repot the plants in the spring or when they become root-bound. In reality, most hypoestes will not live much beyond a year or two before they flower, and many people don't bother to keep the plants after they've bloomed and slipped into their dormant phase. If the plant stops growing in mid-summer, it's probably root-bound, so you can go ahead and repot. Varieties of Hypoestes Phyllostachya The basic species, H. phyllostachya, is also sometimes labeled H. sanguinolenta and called the freckle face. Both are the same plant. Within the basic species, there are many varieties; all are bred for their leaf coloration. The varieties 'Splash' and 'Confetti' are the standards, but even within these two main varieties, there is significant variation in the final leaf coloration. Leaves range from pink-speckled to red-speckled with red leaf bases. Grower's Tips These are not especially challenging plants to grow and will thrive in a grouping of other plants. They do appreciate occasional misting to raise the ambient humidity, and you should pinch off-shoots that reach 15" inches or so. This will encourage bushiness and keep the plant in a more manageable form. Left unpruned, the plant will grow into a small, loose shrub of about two feet. When it does flower, the flowers are insignificant lavender blooms that are produced from spikes. Pinch these off to prolong the plant's vitality, as flowering often seems to mark the beginning of the end for these plants. Lastly, watch out for scale, whitefly, and aphids on these plants and treat at the very first sign of infestation.

by web developer | 03 July, 2020 |

String of Pearls (Senecio rowleyanus)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Dangling strands of ball-like foliage looks just like stands of pearls. A very unusual plant that offers a nice change from leafy tropical plants. The unique form brings an artistic, sculptural quality to a room. Keep away from pets as this plant could make them sick if ingested. Uses The ideal location is somewhere the foliage can be allowed to cascade, such as in a hanging basket or on a plant stand. The perfect plant for a sunny windowsill. Can be placed outdoors in warm months or frost-free regions. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during periods of active growth. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Water approximately once a week if plant is in a bright location. Soil Potting mix designed for cacti and succulents. Basic Care Summary Plant in well drained soil, fertilize regularly.Tolerates drought, but looks best with regular watering. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil for Cacti and Succulents. That will ensure that the soil is sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix. If you choose to make your own soil mix, combine equal parts sand and general purpose potting soil.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a hole in the center of the soil large enough to hold the root ball of the plant.If the plant is spiny be sure to wear gloves for protection. Rubber gloves should be fine if handling small-spined plants but if the plant has long or sharp needles, leather gloves offer more protection.Small plants may be safely moved using kitchen tongs. For moving larger plants, a good method is to wrap the plant with paper towel or tissue paper. For exceptionally large or spiny plants follow with a layer of newspaper or wrapping paper for extra protection. Wrap gently, not too tight, so as not to crush the spines. Tape the outer layer of paper closed at several points to hold snug. Once the plant is moved to its new pot and secure, then the wrappings can be carefully removed.Remove the plant from its pot. Place it in the planting hole and press soil firmly around the roots, just covering the root ball. For spiny plants, use a stick, spatula, or other utensil to move the soil and to keep distance between your hands and the spines.Repot every 2 years. Unless the roots are pot-bound the same container can be used. If a larger pot is needed choose one not more than 1-2” (3-5cm) larger in diameter than the existing pot. Watering Instructions Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the plant. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Discard any excess water that has accumulated in the pot’s saucer.Don’t water again until the top 1-2” (3-5cm) of soil is completely dry. Check the soil moisture with your finger. Plant may require less water during the winter months when it’s growing more slowly because of lower light levels. Some species may even go dormant for a few months in winter. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for cactus and succulent plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long.A general-purpose fertilizer for house plants can be used for feeding cacti or succulents but it must be diluted to one quarter the strength of the normal rate. Pruning Instructions Cactus and succulent plants can be pruned to remove dead or damaged parts or to maintain a specific size or shape. Pruning encourages new growth, branching, and provides plant pieces that can be used for propagating more plants. Keeping the plant trimmed also encourages more side-shoots and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Depending on the growth habit of the plant: long succulent leaves can be cut back to the base of the plant. Side stems can be cut back to the main trunk. If trimming to shape, cut off smaller segments just above a joint.Baby cacti that grow on the main plant are known as “pups”. They can get very thick on some types of cacti. Pups can be cut off with a sharp knife at a 45-degree angle. Allow the cut area on the pups to air dry until a callous forms and they can be set in moist sand to root and eventually form new plants.Some cacti and succulents produce “offsets”. These are plants that grow next to the mother plant by short rhizomes. These can be cut off at the rhizome and used to start new plants just like pups Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 4-6" (10-15cm) Space Range: 8-10" (20-25cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Cactus, Kalanchoe, Desert Rose USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 03 July, 2020 |

String of Hearts (Ceropegia woodii)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features A gorgeous cascade of succulent heart-shaped leaves that seem to float along wiry stems. Each leaf is marbled with silver, giving the whole plant a silvery glow. Produces very unusual tubular flowers from summer into fall. This is a climbing, trailing plant in its native habitat of South Africa. Uses Looks great spilling over container edges. Very decorative on a small table or in a hanging basket. May be displayed outdoors in warmer weather. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season with mild liquid fertilizer. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during active growth. Trim back as needed. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the plant. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Discard any excess water that has accumulated in the pot’s saucer.Don’t water again until the top 1-2” (3-5cm) of soil is completely dry. Check the soil moisture with your finger. Plant may require less water during the winter months when it’s growing more slowly because of lower light levels. Some species may even go dormant for a few months in winter. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Cactus and succulent plants can be pruned to remove dead or damaged parts or to maintain a specific size or shape. Pruning encourages new growth, branching, and provides plant pieces that can be used for propagating more plants. Keeping the plant trimmed also encourages more side-shoots and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Depending on the growth habit of the plant: long succulent leaves can be cut back to the base of the plant. Side stems can be cut back to the main trunk. If trimming to shape, cut off smaller segments just above a joint.Baby cacti that grow on the main plant are known as “pups”. They can get very thick on some types of cacti. Pups can be cut off with a sharp knife at a 45-degree angle. Allow the cut area on the pups to air dry until a callous forms and they can be set in moist sand to root and eventually form new plants.Some cacti and succulents produce “offsets”. These are plants that grow next to the mother plant by short rhizomes. These can be cut off at the rhizome and used to start new plants just like pups. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Purple Bloom Time: Summer to autumn Height Range: 6-8" (15-20cm) Space Range: 1-2' (0.3-0.6m) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 50°F (4° to 10°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Weeping Fig, Orchid USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 03 July, 2020 |

Sansevieria Cylindrica

Sansevieria Cylindrica Care: Growing The Cylindrical Snake Plant Sansevieria Cylindrica (san-se-VEER-ee-uh sil-IN-dree-kuh) is a perennial succulent plant that belongs to the genus Sansevieria part of the Asparagaceae family. It is native to Angola and commonly referred to as Cylindrical Snake Plant. But other common names as well such as: African Spear Skyline Spear Cylindrical Mother-in-Laws tongue Spear orchid, Spear plant, Spear Sansevieria

by web developer | 03 July, 2020 |

Prayer Plant (Green Leaf)

Prayer Plant Plant Features Prayer plant is a good houseplant: It's easy to grow, has fun foliage, and is a hardy indoor plant, ensuring you can be pretty successful with it! Prayer plant is a low, spreading plant that's often grown in hanging baskets, but will also grow horizontally along a tabletop or other surface. It's a slow grower, so no matter where you have prayer plant, you don't need to worry about it growing out of bounds.This hardy indoor plant earned its common name from the fact that the leaves tend to fold together at night, like a pair of praying hands. Most types of prayer plant have variegated foliage, adding to the plant's overall interest. Prayer plant does produce flowers, but they're not large or particularly showy. This is a good houseplant to grow for its leaves. Prayer Plant Questions?If you grow prayer plant, or would like to, and have questions about it, just drop us an email! One of our indoor plant experts will get back to you. And, don't miss out on our newsletter. Sign up now! Prayer Plant Growing Instructions Grow prayer plant in low, medium, or bright light. In bright light, it's best to protect the leaves from direct sun by using a sheer curtain or other filter. Water prayer plant just before the soil surface dries. This hardy indoor plant is likes to stay relatively moist (but not sopping wet all the time). Its leaves can start to turn brown if it dries out too much or too often.  Prayer plant doesn't need much fertilizer; just once or twice a year (preferably in spring or summer) is enough to keep it healthy. You can certainly fertilize it more frequently if you wish. Use any fertilizer formulated for indoor plants and follow the directions on the packaging. Prayer plant prefers above-average humidity levels, but typically grows well in most homes. If your home's air is especially dry in winter, boosting humidity around your prayer plant will make it happier.Note: Prayer plant is not intended for human or animal consumption.  Complement your Prayer Plant with these varieties BananaBanana and prayer plant combine together to create an amazingly bold, tropical look. Jungle DrumUse jungle drum's interesting corrugated foliage as a lovely contrast to prayer plant. Purple PerfectionPurple perfection's rich color is a stunning complement to prayer plant's variegated spots.

by web developer | 03 July, 2020 |

Prayer Plant (Maranta leuconeura)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features This plant gets its common name "Prayer Plant" because the leaves fold closed at night similar to a pair of praying hands. Colorful foliage adds a decorator touch to any room. Can also be grown outdoors during warm weather on a shaded porch, balcony or patio. Uses Perfect for all kinds of containers. Very decorative on a small table or in a hanging basket. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Watering Water every 5 to 7 days depending on light and temperature. Keep soil evenly moist, but not soggy. Soil All-purpose commercial potting mix. Basic Care Summary Rotate plants often to maintain uniform growth. Keep soil evenly moist. Trim plant if needed to maintain desired size and shape. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-18" (30-46cm) Space Range: 9-12" (23-30cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Orchid, Aglaonema, Bromeliad USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Calathea, Prayer Plant (Calathea fasciata)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features A wonderful foliage plant that offers color and brightness for any room! Its broad leaves are dark green variegated with white on the upper surface and often reddish purple on the undersides. The variegation patterns differ amongst available varieties. All varieties make beautiful companions to finely textured ferns or palms. Uses Perfect for all kinds of containers. Very decorative on a small table or in a hanging basket. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Watering Water every 5 to 7 days depending on light and temperature. Keep soil evenly moist, but not soggy. Soil All-purpose commercial potting mix. Basic Care Summary Rotate plants often to maintain uniform growth. Keep soil evenly moist. Trim plant if needed to maintain desired size and shape. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-18" (30-46cm) Space Range: 9-12" (23-30cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Orchid, Aglaonema, Bromeliad USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Pothos 'Jade' (Epipremnum pinnatum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features The ultimate home or office plant for beginners or anyone seeking a beautiful, low-maintenance plant. Trailing stems of heart-shaped foliage look great sprawling along a desk or table, cascading from a hanging basket, or dangling from a planter on a shelf. Although consistent care is always recommended, this is a plant that can take some neglect and still bounce back. Uses Looks great grown in containers and hanging baskets. A terrific plant for tall plant stands where the trailing foliage will create a cascade of foliage over time. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Watering Water every 5 to 7 days depending on light and temperature. Keep soil evenly moist, but not soggy. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Very easy to grow. Best in fertile, well-drained soil kept evenly moist.Trim plant freely to maintain desired size and shape. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-15" (30-38cm) Space Range: 12-24" (30-61cm) Lowest Temperature: 60° to 80°F (16° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Orchid, Fern USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Pothos 'Neon' (Epipremnum pinnatum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features An electrifying color variation on the standard Pothos. ‘Neon’ has all of the tough, reliable features houseplant lovers have come to expect from Pothos, but with glowing, neon-green foliage. Place where the vines can fall freely or trail along a shelf for the best effect. Uses Looks great grown in containers and hanging baskets. A terrific plant for tall plant stands where the trailing foliage will create a cascade of foliage over time. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Watering Water every 5 to 7 days depending on light and temperature. Keep soil evenly moist, but not soggy. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Very easy to grow. Best in fertile, well-drained soil kept evenly moist.Trim plant freely to maintain desired size and shape. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-15" (30-38cm) Space Range: 12-24" (30-61cm) Lowest Temperature: 60° to 80°F (16° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Orchid, Fern USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Pilea Peperomioides

Pilea peperomioides Sure, money doesn’t grow on trees, but the Coin Plant / Chinese Money Plant (Pilea peperomioides) is worth spending some time on. Pilea peperomioides is an Asiatic perennial herb that is native to Yunnan Province in Southern China at the foot of the Himalayas. Pileas are a part of the stinging-nettle family, Urticaceae. Plants in this family usually have stinging hairs filled with irritating histamines. Achoo! Inflorescences consist of clusters of highly-reduced (missing more than one whorl), unshowy, unisexual flowers. Many plants in this family are considered weedy. Some Urtica are used as an herbal tea for various blood and menstrual ailments. The Coin Plant has been quite a mystery in recent times, especially in the UK. Samples of it would be taken to Kew Gardens to be identified from houseplant collections from the 70s and onwards to be returned with non-committal suggestions such as ‘possibly a Peperomia’, ‘please send flowers next time’ or ‘we do not identify sterile material’. It wasn’t until 1978 that leaves and an inflorescence (flower spike) arrived at Kew, sent by Mrs D. Walport of Northolt. This sample baffled the botanists, as the leaves were like a Peperomia, but the inflorescence was like a Pilea’s. When there is doubt about plant identity, the herbarium records are scoured to see if anything like this has been found in the past. Kew botanist Wessel Marais found that it had been seen and described before by German botanist Friedrich Diels as P. peperomioides. The Latin name is appropriate, as “peperomioides” translates to peperomia-like. Of course, although Diels described it to the botanical world officially naming it in 1912, samples had been collected from China by George Forrest in 1910 in the Tsangshan mountain range, which rises to almost 14,000 feet in altitude (4,250m), just west of the ancient city of Dali (Tali) in the western Yunnan Province. As it turns out, these plants had been in local cultivation in Yunnan Province as an ornamental plant for quite some time. However, this plant, like many other Pilea, is insignificant in value, and like other Pilea, it wasn’t paid much attention. Even though it had been described in 1912, it had been forgotten about for almost 30 years. Then in 1946, it was rediscovered and brought to Norway by a Norwegian missionary Agnar Espegren, upon the expulsion of religion and foreigners by Chairman Mao. From Norway, it was distributed by friends to friends, and eventually all over the world as a houseplant. Because there was never really any public demand for this plant, it was never commercially grown until the late 2010’s. Thankfully, money can’t buy me (plant) love. General Care   Sunlight Medium indirect light to dappled sun. Water Water weekly. Allow soil to dry out before watering. Soil should be dry about 2" down from surface. Humidity Normal room humidity is fine, but if the edges burn or crisp, raise the humidity levels. Temperature 55°F-85°F (13°C-30°C). It’s best not to let it go below 50°F (10°C). Common Problems It is generally a very easy-going plant. May get spider mites and mealybugs. Treat spider mites and mealybugs as soon as they appear with weekly sprays of horticultural (Neem) oil and regular wipe-downs of the plan SYMPTOM: Leaves turning brown and crispy at leaf edges CAUSE: Under watered, low humidity, high salts, or potassium deficiency SYMPTOM: Leaf curl/droopy CAUSE: Under watered SYMPTOM: Yellowing, possible black stems, mushiness, falling apart CAUSE: Rot or root disease; overwatering Precautions Generally ok to cats, dogs, and humans if consumed. Best practice is always to keep houseplants out of reach of small children and pets. Questions? Email help@thesill.com Keep growing your plant knowledge. Want more tips? Sign up for our plant care newsletter and find out how to keep your plants healthy and happy.

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Pilea Depressa

Are you a fan of low-growing miniature vines? Pilea depressa is an evergreen ornamental climber native to Brazil and Mexico. The tiny green leaves with scalloped edges are less than ¼ of an inch and grow on delicate pinkish stems. Numerous tiny, white, petal-less flowers grow in the spring to make it nothing less than a fairy vine. This plant is well-adapted to both indoor and outdoor environments. The tiny creeper makes beautiful hanging baskets, fairy-gardens and terrariums. Additionally, you can even use it as a groundcover to replace the grass. Let us share the important facts about the Pilea depressa plant along with its care and propagation. Pilea Depressa Classification Family: Urticaceae.Genus: Pilea.Species: P.depressa. Genus Pilea Pilea is a genus of around 780 ever-green perennial plants. This is the largest flowering genus and stands among one of the largest genera in its family. These plants are usually shade-loving succulents. They are currently found in tropical, sub-tropical and warm regions (except New Zealand and Australia). These have generally got extinct from their natural native habitat in Chinese mountains. Majority of Pileas are famous as indoor decorative plants. Pilea Depressa Common Names Depressed clearweed. Kiereweed. Artillery Plant. Gunpowder plant. The last two names are in reference to the pollen spread from the flowers. Importantly, these names are commonly associated with many other Pileas including the P. microphylla plant. Pilea Depressa ‘Baby Tears’ The Depressa plant gets this common name due to its close resemblance with the original Baby Tears plant. They are often confused with each other. However, they are botanically different and don’t even belong to the same genus. Let us get an introduction to the Baby Tears plant. Original Baby Tears Plant The original Baby Tears plant is botanically known as Soleirolia soleirolli or Helxine soleirolli. This evergreen plant belongs to the genus Soleirolia of the Urticaceae family. This is a 3 to 6 inches tall, trailing houseplant popular for forming moss-like ground covers. This native of Western Mediterranean has small round bright green leaves which grow compactly on fleshy stems. Furthermore, it produces pale white petal-less flowers in summer. This plant does equally well in indoor containers and patios. Moreover, it is popularly used in replacement of grass. P. Baby Tears vs. Original Baby Tears(Soleirolia soleirolli)The leaves of the former are comparatively large, thick and fleshy. Alternatively, the soleirolli’s leaves are shorter, thinner and have smooth edges. Pilea Depressa ‘Tiny Tears’ This is a smaller version of the plant P.depressa ‘baby tears’. Its leaves are about half the size of depressa’s leaves. Moreover, it has a close resemblance with the original Baby Tears (Helxine soleirolli). Still, both of them don’t share any close botanical relationship. The basic features of the plant are as under: The plant is sometimes known as ‘Tiny Toes’ and ‘Leprechaun toes’. Leaves are shiny green, round and pulp with scalloped edges. The plant is a delicate vine and forms excellent ground covers. It is adaptable to both the indoor and outdoor environment. It is an easy to care plant wit fast growth rate. Basic requirements include moist well-drained soil and low light. Pilea Depressa ‘Tiny Tears’ vs. Original ‘Baby Tears’(Soleirolia Soleirolli) The basic differences are as under; Depressa Tiny Tears has thicker foliage, more substantial texture. Alternatively, the later has comparatively thinner foliage. Moreover, unlike Tiny Tear plant, the leaf margins are round and smoilea Depressa Care Water Requirements The water requirement is average. Thrice a week in summer and once a week in winter is an estimated frequency. Just follow the simple rule of keeping the upper layer at least 50 % moist in summer. While, in fall and winter, let the soil get dry between consecutive waterings.Over-watering and water standing at the base may lead to root rot.` Sunlight Requirement The plant usually requires bright shade. In outdoors, select a well-lit shady area. Importantly, keep it away from direct sun, especially the peak hours. In indoors and Pilea depressa terrariums, the plant can do pretty well in the fluorescent light. An ideal place to keep the pots is an east-facing window with a medium level of sunlight exposure.Browning of leaves is a possible sign of over-exposure to  Temperature Requirements Just like other members of this genus, the ideal temperature range for the plant is 15 to 25 °C(60 to 70 °F). These plants are not frost hardy. Regions with the possibility of temperature fall below 12 C( 54 F) are unsuitable for the Depressa plant. Humidity Requirements The plant does pretty well with normal humidity of your zone. However, Optimum humidity range is around 50%. In dry days, you can consider adding some extra humidity by misting. In case of Pilea depressa terrariums, you can place the setup around a humidifier. Substrate/Soil Requirements The substrate should be light and free-draining. Sandy soils are the first preference for the Artillery plant. If you are mixing at home, just mix clean sand and peat in 1:2. Furthermore, you can replace sand with perlite.Optimal PH range for the plant is acidic to neutral (6 to 7.5). Fertilizer Requirements Use a houseplant fertilizer once a month in spring and summer following the instructions on the pack. Howbeit added nutrition is not suitable in winter. Pruning Requirement These plants are vigorous growers and usually get ‘out of control’. To maintain the appearance, you can simply remove the dead or normal leaves from the lower sides of the vines. Pilea Depressa Propagation Pileas are easy to propagate plants. Common method of propagation is by using stem-tip cuttings. In spring, just cut 5 to 7 inches of stem tips of a healthy plant. Fill a small container (about 4 to 5 inches) with a light and well-draining substrate. Water it slightly to make it moist. Now, dip the base of the stem-cuttings in growth hormone and shed any excess powder. Plant the stem-cuttings in the soil and slightly water the plant. Cover the container in a plastic or polythene bag. Keep the bag half-open, as Pileas don’t like high humidity at this stage. Water Propagation You can use water as a growing medium for initial days. Simple take some soft water and dip the stem-tip cutting about 3 inches. Once the roots are developed, you can transfer the plantlet to soil or the potting mix. Some people even keep the P.Depressa plants live permanently in water. And the plant grows pretty happy there. Timeline This is an estimate to help you get an idea about the growth and development of the plant. We recommend keeping an eye on the plant and managing the requirements accordingly. Day 1 to Day 7: Just place the polythene bag (with the plant pot) in a warm place with normal light exposure. Roots will start developing by the end of the week. Now, you can remove the covering bag. Day 7 to Day 40: Keep watering the plant very lightly. You will see shoot development after the third week. Furthermore, you can shift the water plantlets to soil any time by the end of 5th week. Day 40 onward: Just follow the usual care explained above to maintain your beautiful Gun Powder Plant. Related Post: Pilea Glauca Care Summary Pilea depressa is an evergreen, miniature vine. The tiny, green, fleshy leaves with scalloped edges grow on thick pinkish stems. This plant makes excellent fairy gardens, terrariums, hanging baskets and ground covers. The P.depressa ‘baby tears’ and the Baby Tears plant differentiate by the slightly large leaves and wavy edges of the former. On the other hand, Tiny Tears is a simply a smaller version of the Pilea depressa plant. The care includes frequent watering and partial indirect sun.

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Peperomia Rosso

How To Grow and Take Care Of Peperomia Rosso The tropical plant, Peperomia Rosso [pep-er-ROH-mee-uh] [ros-so], is a sport of the popular Peperomia caperata (kap-er-AY-tuh). You may hear ‘rosso peperomia’ called by the common names: Emerald Ripple Pepper Radiator PlantIt is one of many peperomia plant cultivars such as peperomia polybotrya in the Piperaceae (pepper) family. Our Latest Videos Why Do Plants Get Brown Tips? The plant originally hails from Brazil, South America & Central America. This plant’s genus name comes from two Greek words: peperi, which means pepper and homoios, which means resembling. These plants do, indeed, resemble pepper plants and are related to true black pepper. The specific epithet, caperata, is derived from the Latin meaning wrinkled. This is a reference to the texture of the dark green leaves which resembles a baby rubber plant during early growth. Other popular Peperomia varieties include: Peperomia argyreia (watermelon peperomia) Peperomia Silver Frost Peperomia clusiifolia Peperomia prostrata (String of Turtles) Peperomia obtusifolia Peperomia Rosso Care Size & Growth The compact Rosso Peperomia plant grows to be about 8″ inches high and wide. The foliage grows in a rosette formation. The dark green, deeply corrugated, heart-shaped, wrinkled leaves grow at the ends of long stems. The leaves themselves are 1″ – 1.5″ inch long. The stems are red-tinged. Leaves may be deeply veined and maybe so dark green as to appear black along the corrugated surface. Flowering & Fragrance The flowers are greenish white, very small and grow at the end of 2″ – 3″ inches long reddish spikes. The scentless flowers appear in the springtime and summer. They’re not especially pretty or showy, but they are unusual and exciting. Light Conditions & Temperature Rosso peperomia does best with bright, indirect light. It can do well in partial sun or with either morning or evening sun, but it does not tolerate full, direct sun. Fluorescent lighting is an excellent choice when growing these easy care indoor plants. They do not like to be kept in very dark settings or very harsh, direct sunlight. Consistent light of a grow light, or fluorescent light bulb is perfect for them. Some problems come from inconsistent or incorrect lighting. Too little light can cause your plant to grow very slowly and too much sun produces scorched leaves. The best temperature for your Rosso Peperomia is at temperatures ranging from 55° – 75° degrees Fahrenheit (13° C – 24° C). Place this Peperomia Rosso plants well away from heating vents and doors that open and close in the hot summer time or the cold winter. These plants cannot tolerate extremes of hot or cold. This plant is winter hardy in USDA hardiness zones 11 through 12. Watering & Feeding The Emerald Ripple cannot stand extremes. Do not allow Rosso Peperomia to dry out entirely nor overwater it. When the soil feels mostly dry, provide a thorough, deep watering. The fragile roots of Peperomia do not tolerate drought conditions. Always water from below and allow the plant to soak up all the water it needs. Then allow the allow excess water to pour out of the drainage holes before setting the plant in a saucer. Water your Emerald Ripple every 7 – 10 days. Never get the crown of the plant wet. This is especially important during cold weather as dampness on the plant’s crown will lead to rot. About once a year, late in the springtime, pour water through the plant (being careful not to get the foliage wet). Allow the water to run through the potting soil to help remove salts which build up from fertilizers. Peperomia plants prefer standard household humidity. If the weather is especially hot and dry in the summertime or if your house or terrarium is arid due to heating, set your plant on a pebble tray for high humidity to balance out the environment. Misting is unnecessary unless you use it as a means of cleaning the plant. Reduce water significantly for indoor Radiator Plants in the wintertime. Outdoors, never water your Peperomia during the autumn and colder months. A balanced, 20–20–20 fertilizer is the right choice for these houseplants. Read the instructions carefully and use a half strength mixture. During the plants growing season, use diluted liquid fertilizer twice a month and use plant food every 3 watering sessions. Indoors during the fall and winter, fertilize only once a month. You may also choose to use time-released granules or plant fertilizer spikes. As with water, take care not to allow fertilizer to come in contact with the leaves. If you’ve just repotted your plant in fresh potting soil or just purchased your plant, do not fertilize it for 6 months. Begin fertilizing in the first spring after 6 months has passed. Soil & Transplanting Peperomia is sometimes considered a succulent and sometimes thought of as an epiphyte. Like epiphytes, some types of Peperomia can grow on trees. However, these plants are not true epiphytes. They do not just use their roots as a means of staying in place. They feed off the structure of the tree in a parasitic manner. Either way, these plants need a well-draining potting mix that retains some moisture. A standard cactus or succulent potting mix will do. An orchid mix may even be a possibility. Because of the plants’ tiny root system and fine roots, it is a good candidate as a dish garden plant. It does not need especially deep soil, but it does need light, airy well-draining soil. A soil that retains moisture and feeds the roots consistently. If a commercial succulent or cactus mix is not available, make potting soil by combining 50% perlite and 50% peat moss. A little gravel also helps to provide good air circulation around the roots. Like many succulents, Peperomia Rosso likes to be a little bit root bound. Don’t repot until the plant begins to outgrow its home. Your Emerald Ripple needs to move a pot size up if the roots begin to grow through the drain holes. Take care when repotting as this plant has fragile, delicate roots and damages easily. Grooming & Maintenance Prune the plant periodically to control size and shape. Mist once or twice a month and wipe the leaves gently with a soft cloth to control dust. The best time to prune your Emerald Ripple plant is early in the springtime. Don’t be afraid of pruning dramatically. These fast-growing plants fill out quickly. Regular pinching back and pruning will help the plant maintain an attractive, bushy appearance. How To Propagate Emerald Ripple Pepper Rosso is easy to propagate from cuttings, similar to the African Violets. Propagation of Peperomia is very much like the propagation of other succulents. If you plan to propagate with stem cuttings: Cut off a relatively long piece with a couple of leaves. Poke a hole into some clean, fresh compost and place the end of the stems in the hole. Firm up the compost around the stems. Keep the compost lightly watered and keep the cutting in a warm, still setting with indirect, bright sunlight. If you choose to do leaf cuttings: Cut off a leaf with the stem attached. Cut the stem in a sloping manner and dip it into some rooting hormone. Put it into a clean, fresh compost with a little rooting hormone mixed in. Treat as you would a stem cutting. You will see growth within a month. Peperomia Pests and Diseases A well-kept Rosso Peperomia plants have no major disease or insect problems. Overwatering, extremes in temperature and extremes in lighting can cause problems. Weakened plants are susceptible to attacks from: Whitefly Spider mites Mealybugs Poor conditions may also cause problems with leaf spot. Excessive watering or overhead water can cause root and crown rot. Spider mites and fungus gnats may be problematic when overwatered. Take care to water your plant infrequently. Rosso Peperomia like other peperomias is sometimes subject to cucumber mosaic virus which causes a malady known as ring spot. If you notice withered, deformed the leaves on your plant, pinch or prune them off and the plant should recover on its own. Plants in need of repotting or overwatered plants may tend to wilt because their roots are not getting enough air. Be sure to keep them in the right sized pots with a suitable, airy potting medium. Water correctly. Outdoors Peperomia rosso may have a problem with slugs and snails. Use a slug and snail bait which contains sodium ferric EDTA. Alternately, just set out a few small dishes filled with beer. The slugs and snails will climb in to get a drink and will not be able to get out. Learn more about “Radiator Plants” Pests and Diseases Is Peperomia Toxic or Poisonous? Peperomia rosso are entirely safe to grow around children and pets. They are entirely non-toxic. Is Peperomia Invasive? Peperomia is not considered invasive. Uses For Peperomia Caperata Rosso Since Rosso Peperomia care is easy. It grows well in a small pot size making it an excellent desktop plant or general office or public space plant. The consistent temperature and lighting to be found in public places and offices are very conducive to happy, healthy, thriving Emerald Ripple plants. They make excellent choices as bathroom plants if your bathroom gets good natural light or if you keep a fluorescent light set up for your plant. If you’re in a tropical setting, use your dark green Peperomia as a groundcover in a shady area with well-aerated soil and good drainage.

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum hybrid)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Peace Lilies are highly valued as houseplants for their ease of care. The leaves will begin to droop very obviously when the plant is thirsty, then quickly perk back up once it is watered. The smooth glossy leaves compliment any décor and they group well with other houseplants. Interesting, spoon-like white blooms add to the Peace Lily's appeal. Uses Perfect for all kinds of containers. Makes a breathtaking potted specimen plant. May be displayed outdoors in warmer weather. Makes a lovely gift! Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil All-purpose mix. Basic Care Summary Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during active growth. Dust or wipe off leaves for best display. Planting Instructions If the plant was purchased in a pot, then it is probably already in a quality potting soil and requires little more than watering and grooming for a while.If potting a flowering plant to bring indoors or to give as a gift plant, start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in bright location for best performance.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Most potted flowering plants prefer consistently moist but well-drained soil. If the soil gets too dry the blooms can wilt and they may not recover. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. Follow the product directions for proper timing and application rates. Pruning Instructions Remove the flowers as they fade. This keeps the plant looking tidy and may encourage more blooms depending on the type of plant. After flowering many blooming plants make attractive houseplants. Be sure to trim the foliage to maintain the desired size and shape. Occasional trimming encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Some plants will re-bloom on their own, but others may have very specific day-length or temperature requirements to flower again. A bit of research may be necessary to determine what is needed to encourage future blooming. Some plants, such as bulbs or perennials, can be turned into wonderful garden additions after the flowers have been enjoyed indoors. Plant Details Category: Flowering Houseplant Available Colors: White Bloom Time: All year Height Range: 1-3' (0.3-0.9m) Space Range: 1-4' (0.3-1.2m) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Dieffenbachia, Yucca, Ficus USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Aloe Indoors (Aloe vera)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Aloe vera are known as Medicinal Aloe for the burn soothing gel within their fleshy leaves. Grown indoors or out, Aloe are an easy care plant and their narrow, water-holding leaves provide nice contrast to plants of broad or finely textured foliage. Plant them with other succulents for an attractive, low maintenance display. Uses Windowsills, succulent terrariums, dish gardens. Plant Feed Apply liquid fertilizer 2 or 3 times during growing season. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Cactus/succulent mix. Basic Care Summary Prefers very well drained soil. Allow soil to dry moderately between waterings. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil for Cacti and Succulents. That will ensure that the soil is sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix. If you choose to make your own soil mix, combine equal parts sand and general purpose potting soil.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a hole in the center of the soil large enough to hold the root ball of the plant.If the plant is spiny be sure to wear gloves for protection. Rubber gloves should be fine if handling small-spined plants but if the plant has long or sharp needles, leather gloves offer more protection.Small plants may be safely moved using kitchen tongs. For moving larger plants, a good method is to wrap the plant with paper towel or tissue paper. For exceptionally large or spiny plants follow with a layer of newspaper or wrapping paper for extra protection. Wrap gently, not too tight, so as not to crush the spines. Tape the outer layer of paper closed at several points to hold snug. Once the plant is moved to its new pot and secure, then the wrappings can be carefully removed.Remove the plant from its pot. Place it in the planting hole and press soil firmly around the roots, just covering the root ball. For spiny plants, use a stick, spatula, or other utensil to move the soil and to keep distance between your hands and the spines.Repot every 2 years. Unless the roots are pot-bound the same container can be used. If a larger pot is needed choose one not more than 1-2” (3-5cm) larger in diameter than the existing pot. Watering Instructions Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the plant. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Discard any excess water that has accumulated in the pot’s saucer.Don’t water again until the top 1-2” (3-5cm) of soil is completely dry. Check the soil moisture with your finger. Plant may require less water during the winter months when it’s growing more slowly because of lower light levels. Some species may even go dormant for a few months in winter. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for cactus and succulent plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long.A general-purpose fertilizer for house plants can be used for feeding cacti or succulents but it must be diluted to one quarter the strength of the normal rate. Pruning Instructions Cactus and succulent plants can be pruned to remove dead or damaged parts or to maintain a specific size or shape. Pruning encourages new growth, branching, and provides plant pieces that can be used for propagating more plants. Keeping the plant trimmed also encourages more side-shoots and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Depending on the growth habit of the plant: long succulent leaves can be cut back to the base of the plant. Side stems can be cut back to the main trunk. If trimming to shape, cut off smaller segments just above a joint.Baby cacti that grow on the main plant are known as “pups”. They can get very thick on some types of cacti. Pups can be cut off with a sharp knife at a 45-degree angle. Allow the cut area on the pups to air dry until a callous forms and they can be set in moist sand to root and eventually form new plants.Some cacti and succulents produce “offsets”. These are plants that grow next to the mother plant by short rhizomes. These can be cut off at the rhizome and used to start new plants just like pups. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 8-24" (20-61cm) Space Range: 12-24" (30-61cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Succulents, Kalanchoe, Desert Rose USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Money Plant, Money Tree, Fortune Tree, Guiana Chestnut (Pachira aquatica)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features A traditional housewarming or business opening gift in Asian cultures, Money Plant is a whimsical looking tree with a broad thick trunk and very slender branches sporting glossy leaves. Often multiple trunks are braided together increasing the thick to thin effect. Do not overwater and a money tree can prosper for many years. Uses Small plants are very decorative in a windowsill or on a tabletop. Tall specimens make a great accent plant in bright locations indoors. Adds a fun, tropical feel to decks, patios or porches in warm weather. Plant Feed Monthly with mild liquid fertilizer during spring and summer. Watering Water every 5 to 7 days depending on light and temperature. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Prefers humid environments and well drained soil. Will tolerate slightly dry soil, so take care not to overwater. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 3-6' (0.9-1.8m) Space Range: 1-2' (0.3-0.6m) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Lucky Bamboo, Orchid, Pothos USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Leo Lithops

Those succulents that you thought looked like rocks? They are called Lithops (or Living stones), a genus of succulents native to southern Africa. Older Lithops form clumps of colourful pebbles in their pot, which makes them ideal as an accent piece in your garden. As small and slow-growing plants, they are relatively easy to care for, especially once you get a hang of the routine. In this article, you will find some basic knowledge to take good care of your Lithops.

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Peperomia, Radiator Plant (Peperomia species)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Peperomia plants are so beautiful, easy to grow, and available in such a wide array of foliage colors, textures and sizes that it could be difficult to own just one! This is a great plant for anyone who isn't experienced with houseplants or who simply wants a relatively care-free plant. Peperomia is a vast plant genus with over a thousand known species, most of which are native to tropical regions of the Americas. Hundreds of these different species are cultivated for use as houseplants. Uses Very decorative on a small table or in a hanging basket. Perfect for all kinds of containers. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil All-purpose mix. Basic Care Summary Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly.  Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 4-10" (10-25cm) Space Range: 6-12" (15-30cm) Lowest Temperature: 60° to 80°F (16° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: African Violet, Sanseviera, Pothos USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Lucky Bamboo, Ribbon Plant (Dracaena sanderiana)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Long revered in the ancient tradition of Feng Shui, this plant is well suited to modern homes and lifestyles. While not a true bamboo, Lucky Bamboo truly is an attractive, easy care houseplant. Give it a place of honor on a tabletop, shelf or mantel to best appreciate the beauty of its simple form. Uses Perfect for all kinds of containers. A wonderful easy-care gift plant! Plant Feed Dilute an all-purpose houseplant food to 1/10 the strength directed on the label. Apply monthly to soil-grown plants and every three months to plants growing in water alone. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings or change the water every two weeks. Soil All-purpose mix or distilled water. Basic Care Summary When grown in soil, water thoroughly but allow the soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a diluted houseplant fertilizer monthly.For plants grown in water alone, keep the roots covered with water at all times. Empty the water and refill the container with fresh distilled water every two weeks. Apply a diluted houseplant fertilizer every three months.  Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-36" (30-91cm) Space Range: 12-18" (30-46cm) Lowest Temperature: 60° to 80°F (16° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: African Violet, Ivy, Orchid USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Kokedama

Kokedama Care: How To Care For Kokedama String Gardens Kokedama is a Japanese word that, simply translated, means “moss ball”. Sometimes called the “Poor Man’s Bonsai” or “string gardens,” the of art of binding plants into green, mossy orbs dates back centuries to the Edo era in Japan (around 1600 AD). Making kokedama is a fun process that involves stripping soil from the plant's roots, and using a special-clayrich soil blend to sculpt the plant into a ball, which is later bound with moss. Check out our step-by-step instructions for the  project, or sign up for a workshop to have us walk you through the process! Caring for these living sculptures varies widely depending on the species of the plant used. Here’s the procedure that we use to water our kokedama, as well as a list of the plant types and species we commonly use to make ours, with the care needed for each plant.

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Pothos, Devil's Ivy (Scindapsus species)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Truly one of the toughest, most popular and easy care houseplants! Pothos sends out trailing stems of green leaves, variegated with white or gold. The variegation is more pronounced when they are grown in bright light, but they do adapt to lower light levels. Place where the vines can fall freely or trail along a shelf for the best effect. Uses Looks great grown in containers and hanging baskets. A terrific plant for tall plant stands where the trailing foliage will create a cascade of foliage over time. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Watering Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during active growth. Dust or wipe off leaves for best display.  Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-15" (30-38cm) Space Range: 12-24" (30-61cm) Lowest Temperature: 60° to 80°F (16° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Dracaena, Spider Plant USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

Air Plant (Tillandsia species)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Tillandsias are a diverse group of plants known as “epiphytes”, or air plants. In their native habitat of Central and South America, Tillandsias are found growing anchored to tree branches or rock walls. Plants attach themselves with roots, but nutrients are absorbed through the foliage. Incredibly easy to grow, and available in a fascinating array of foliage forms and bloom colors. Uses Plants can be mounted to all sorts of supports for hanging on a wall, such as wooden plaques, branches, or bark. Very popular for growing tucked in a large seashell. Little plants are ideal for small glass orb terrariums or simply dangling from a string in a window with bright, indirect light. A wonderful easy-care gift plant! Plant Feed Monthly with balanced liquid fertilizer (quarter strength) during active growth. Watering Thoroughly soak the mounting stone or wood, and allow to dry well before watering again. Those not mounted should be soaked in water once a week and misted daily during active growth. Soil If needed, use orchid bark mix. Basic Care Summary Fertilize regularly. Once a week submerge plant in water and soak for about an hour. Allow to dry for a few hours before returning to planter. Mist daily during active growth. Planting Instructions If the plant was purchased in a pot, then it is probably already in a quality potting mix and requires little more than watering and grooming. Epiphytes rarely need to be repotted.Epiphytes grow on other plants. They can be grown in a light, well-drained mix of bark, composted peat and perlite, or, rather than growing in a pot, epiphytes’ roots can be wrapped in sphagnum moss and the entire plant can then be mounted onto wood or other surfaces.When repotting, start with a good quality, sterile bark mix. Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting mix up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. Once potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give the plant a good start. Watering Instructions Epiphytes prefer the bark mix to dry in between thorough watering. Check the bark mix moisture with your finger. If the top inch (3 cm) of bark is dry, it’s time to water. Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the plant. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Discard any excess water that has accumulated in the pot’s saucer.Epiphytes that are not potted in a container should be misted well at least three times a week, more often if the air is dry. Mist all the foliage so that the water can absorb through the leaves. The plant can also be submerged in water for two to three minutes, once a week for a more thorough watering. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic.Liquid fertilizer is the best for plants that aren't potted in a container. These types of epiphytes absorb the plant food through the leaves. Select a product with a nutritional balance of 20-20-20 and dilute it to a quarter the recommended strength.Slow-release fertilizer is the best for potted epiphytes. Select a product with a nutritional balance of 20-20-20 and lightly sprinkle the plant food at the base of the plant.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants. Pruning Instructions Most epiphytes require little or no pruning. Cascading forms can be trimmed back to maintain a preferred size. To prune, choose a point along the stem where the leaves branch. Cut just above this point so the buds for new growth aren't removed.Some plants will re-bloom on their own, but others may have very specific day-length or temperature requirements to flower again. A bit of research may be necessary to determine what is needed to encourage future blooming. Plant Details Category: Flowering Houseplant Available Colors: Flowers in shades of pink, red, yellow, orange and purple Bloom Time: All year Height Range: 3-12" (8-30cm) Space Range: 3-12" (8-30cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Orchid, Wandering Jew, Fern USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |

African Violet (Saintpaulia ionantha)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features A rosette of lush foliage supports a beautiful display of blooms throughout the year. Depending on variety, flower types vary from single to double and even ruffled, in a wide range of colors. Brighter, filtered light is best in winter months for continuous flowering. Uses Looks great grown in containers and hanging baskets. May be displayed outdoors in warmer weather. Makes a lovely gift! Plant Feed Every two weeks with mild liquid fertilizer. Watering Keep soil moist throughout growth and bloom season. Soil All-purpose mix. Basic Care Summary Avoid wetting foliage while watering. Keep soil moist throughout growth and bloom season. Fertilize during active growth. Remove faded flowers for best display. Planting Instructions If the plant was purchased in a pot, then it is probably already in a quality potting soil and requires little more than watering and grooming for a while.If potting a flowering plant to bring indoors or to give as a gift plant, start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in bright location for best performance.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Most potted flowering plants prefer consistently moist but well-drained soil. If the soil gets too dry the blooms can wilt and they may not recover. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. Follow the product directions for proper timing and application rates. Pruning Instructions Remove the flowers as they fade. This keeps the plant looking tidy and may encourage more blooms depending on the type of plant. After flowering many blooming plants make attractive houseplants. Be sure to trim the foliage to maintain the desired size and shape. Occasional trimming encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Some plants will re-bloom on their own, but others may have very specific day-length or temperature requirements to flower again. A bit of research may be necessary to determine what is needed to encourage future blooming. Some plants, such as bulbs or perennials, can be turned into wonderful garden additions after the flowers have been enjoyed indoors. Plant Details Category: Flowering Houseplant Available Colors: Flowers in shades of purple, pink, white, lavender, and bicolor Bloom Time: All year Height Range: 4-6" (10-15cm) Space Range: 12-15" (30-38cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Wandering Jew, Sansevieria, Calathea USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 02 July, 2020 |