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Your Journey to Plant Parenthood

Empowering all people to be plant people — a collection of articles from Geoponics’s team of Plant Experts across a variety of plant care topics to inspire confidence in the next generation of plant parents. Welcome to Plant Parenthood™.


How to Bring Your Plants Indoors for the Fall and Winter

Once the sunny days of summer are behind us and we begin to adjust to lower light all around (goodbye, daylight saving time), it’s time to bring our outdoor plants inside. If you brought your sun-loving plants outside, you already know that there are factors to keep in mind to successfully transition your plants’ environment. When bringing your plants back inside, there are a few steps to make sure your plants stay happy and healthy, and that you protect your already happy indoor plants. Inspection Before bringing any houseplants back indoors, be sure to thoroughly inspect them. When plants are left outdoors, they become more susceptible to pests and disease, so you want to make sure to remove the risk of spreading those to the rest of your plants! Check the stems, the tops and undersides of the leaves, as well as the nooks and crevices of certain plants, since that’s where pests like to hide. Prune and Treat If you do find that your plant has pests, remove any heavily infested material, and treat the plant as needed based on the pest at hand. To determine which pest you have and follow specific treatment plans for each type, head to our pests identification blog. If you notice a fungal infection, we recommend removing any infected leaves to prevent it from spreading, and sterilize any tools that come into contact with the plants. Any lackluster or damaged foliage that has succumbed to heavy wind drag or unfavorable conditions can be pruned off the plant to enhance the appearance, and help the plant focus energy on new growth. Leaf cleaning will also be beneficial if there are hard mineral deposits, dust, or debris on the foliage, which block the chlorophyll from absorbing light. Quarantine Once your plants are inspected, pruned, and groomed, you can integrate them back into your home. We recommend quarantining them for a period of 1-2 weeks inside and away from the rest of your collection because pests can be very small (sometimes even microscopic), so at times even after treatment then can pop up again shortly after treatment. Even if you don’t notice pests initially, their eggs could be dormant in the soil and hatch indoors. Inspect Again After the plants have quarantined and acclimated to your home, you should inspect the plants one last time to ensure pests or disease haven’t resurfaced. Prune and treat again if needed. For plants that are good to go, consider refreshing the soil and upgrade in container size if needed. Assimilate Plants Once your plants are cleared from quarantine and are looking refreshed, you can assimilate them into the rest of your indoor jungle! Be sure to follow up with the proper care, including its preferred sunlight and watering conditions. |


by Plant Club | 20 November, 2020 |

Arabian Coffee Tree Indoors (Coffea arabica)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features The Arabian coffee tree is the world’s primary source of coffee beans. This tree is native to Ethiopia but the popularity of coffee, and demand for beans, has resulted in growing operations throughout the world. Coffee trees produce big, glossy, beautiful foliage and make excellent houseplants for bright locations. Plants are not likely to bloom and produce beans when grown as a houseplant. They can also be grown in the ground or large patio planters outdoors in temperate climates. Uses A great potted plant for a sunny spot indoors or on a lightly shaded deck, patio, or porch during warm weather. A lovely landscape plant for warm, frost-free climates. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Thrives in a warm location with bright, indirect light. Keep soil consistently moist. Can be pruned freely to maintain desired size. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 1-6' (0.3-1.8m) Space Range: 2-3' (0.6-0.9m) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 80°F (4° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Dracaena, Dieffenbachia, Aglaonema USDA Zone: 10-11 |


by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Why you need plants in your life

Ant Plant (Dischidia pectenoides)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features A fascinating vining plant that produces two types of leaves. Along with ordinary leaves, it develops large pouch-like leaves containing modified root structures that can absorb nutrients. When grown outdoors ants enter into the pouch through a small opening and use the hollow leaves for shelter and food storage. In return the plant is nourished by the carbon dioxide and waste the ants provide. Produces small red flowers year-round followed by interesting seed pods. This epiphyte is native to the Philippines where it grows on trees for support. Uses A terrific plant for pots or hanging baskets indoors or out. Ideal for growing in a container and training to a small trellis. May be displayed outdoors in warmer weather. Plant Feed Balanced liquid fertilizer every three months. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Orchid bark mix. Basic Care Summary Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer every three months. Prune freely to maintain size. Planting Instructions If the plant was purchased in a pot, then it is probably already in a quality potting mix and requires little more than watering and grooming. Epiphytes rarely need to be repotted.Epiphytes grow on other plants. They can be grown in a light, well-drained mix of bark, composted peat and perlite, or, rather than growing in a pot, epiphytes’ roots can be wrapped in sphagnum moss and the entire plant can then be mounted onto wood or other surfaces.When repotting, start with a good quality, sterile bark mix. Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting mix up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. Once potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give the plant a good start. Watering Instructions Epiphytes prefer the bark mix to dry in between thorough watering. Check the bark mix moisture with your finger. If the top inch (3 cm) of bark is dry, it’s time to water. Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the plant. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Discard any excess water that has accumulated in the pot’s saucer.Epiphytes that are not potted in a container should be misted well at least three times a week, more often if the air is dry. Mist all the foliage so that the water can absorb through the leaves. The plant can also be submerged in water for two to three minutes, once a week for a more thorough watering. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic.Liquid fertilizer is the best for plants that aren't potted in a container. These types of epiphytes absorb the plant food through the leaves. Select a product with a nutritional balance of 20-20-20 and dilute it to a quarter the recommended strength.Slow-release fertilizer is the best for potted epiphytes. Select a product with a nutritional balance of 20-20-20 and lightly sprinkle the plant food at the base of the plant.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants. Pruning Instructions Most epiphytes require little or no pruning. Cascading forms can be trimmed back to maintain a preferred size. To prune, choose a point along the stem where the leaves branch. Cut just above this point so the buds for new growth aren't removed.Some plants will re-bloom on their own, but others may have very specific day-length or temperature requirements to flower again. A bit of research may be necessary to determine what is needed to encourage future blooming. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 1-9' (0.3-2.7m)) Space Range: 2-3' (0.6-0.9m) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 80°F (4° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Dieffenbachia, Ficus USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Annual Combination Planter Whiskey Barrel Planter

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features A practical and beautiful way to repurpose used wine and whisky barrels. The 100% oak half-barrel promises years of durability and adds a touch of rustic charm in the landscape. Great for mixed flower or vegetable plantings and big enough to feature a single shrub or dwarf tree. Uses Perfect for adding instant color to any location! They may be used to liven porches and patios. Plant Feed Fertilize regularly for best display. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil Fertile, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Water as needed to keep soil evenly moist, especially in hot weather. Fertilize regularly for best Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot or pack. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, gently grasp the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start.Plan ahead for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It's best to install cages at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a small trellis that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions Plants in containers can dry out quickly, depending on the weather, and may need water more frequently than plants in the garden bed. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). The flowers are not particularly attractive so any buds that appear should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Container Available Colors: Assorted Bloom Time: Summer Height Range: 6-36" (15-91cm) Space Range: 6-24" (15-61cm Lowest Temperature: 30° to 40°F (-1° to 4°C) Plant Light: Sun to Part Shade Companion Plants: Potted Herbs, Patio Tree, Rose Planter USDA Zone: 10-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Annual Combination Planter Spring Viola Bowl (Viola cornuta)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Spring planters are a perfect way to chase away the dreary days of winter. Use them to add a cheerful touch to patios, decks or a sunny balcony. Preplanted flower bowls are a terrific, easy-care gift idea! Uses Perfect for adding instant color to any location! They may be used to liven porches and patios. Plant Feed Fertilize regularly for best display. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil Fertile, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Water as needed to keep soil evenly moist, especially in hot weather. Fertilize regularly for best display. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot or pack. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, gently grasp the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start.Plan ahead for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It's best to install cages at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a small trellis that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions Plants in containers can dry out quickly, depending on the weather, and may need water more frequently than plants in the garden bed. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). The flowers are not particularly attractive so any buds that appear should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Container Available Colors: Assorted Bloom Time: Summer Height Range: 6-8" (15-20cm) Space Range: 6-24" (15-61cm) Lowest Temperature: 30° to 40°F (-1° to 4°C) Plant Light: Sun to Part Shade Companion Plants: Potted Herbs, Patio Tree, Rose Planter USDA Zone: 10-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Alpine Poppy (Papaver alpinum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Wonderful refreshment in the heat of summer! Delicate, saucer-like blooms and fine textured foliage contrast beautifully with the harshness of Alpine Poppies' favored growing sites. Perfect for dry, less fertile soils that mimic that of their native mountain habitat. Uses Excellent for use in difficult spots where nothing else can survive. Perfectly sized for rock gardens and border fronts. Best planted in groups. Plant Feed Not necessary. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Gritty, sharply drained soil. Basic Care Summary Tolerates poor soil, heat, and drought. Best if planted in gritty, sharply drained soil. Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Remove faded flowers for best display. Planting Instructions Perennials can be planted anytime from spring through fall.Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller) to a depth of 12-16” (30-40cm). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients, and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or all-purpose feed that encourages blooming (for example fertilizers labeled 5-10-5).Check the plant label for suggested spacing and the mature height of the plant. Position plants so that taller plants are in the center or background of the landscape design and shorter plants in the foreground. To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Plan ahead, for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It’s best to install cages early in the spring, or at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread.Finish up with a 2” (5cm) layer of mulch such as shredded bark or compost to make the garden look tidy, reduce weeds, and retain soil moisture. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering may be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others, like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.Thoroughly soaking the ground up to 8” (20 cm) every few days is better than watering a little bit daily. Deep watering encourages roots to grow further into the ground resulting in a sturdier plant with more drought tolerance.To check for soil moisture, use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Incorporate fertilizer into the soil when preparing beds for new plants. Established plants should be fed in early spring, then again halfway through the growing season. Avoid applying fertilizer late in the growing season. This stimulates new growth that can be easily damaged by early frosts.Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Reduce the need to fertilize in general by applying a 1-2” (3-5cm) layer of mulch or compost annually. As mulch breaks down it supplies nutrients to the plants and improves the overall soil condition at the same time. Pruning Instructions Depending on the flowering habit, snip off faded blooms individually, or wait until the blooming period is over and remove entire flower stalk down to the base of the plant. Removing old flower stems keeps the plant’s energy focused on vigorous growth instead of seed production. Foliage can be pruned freely through the season to remove damaged or discolored leaves, or to maintain plant size.Do not prune plants after September 1st. Pruning stimulates tender new growth that will damage easily when the first frosts arrive. Perennial plants need time to prepare for winter, or “harden off”. Once plants have died to the ground they are easy to clean up by simply cutting back to about 4” (10cm) above the ground.The flowering plumes and foliage of ornamental grasses create a beautiful feature in the winter landscape. Leave the entire plant for the winter and cut it back to the ground in early spring, just before new growth starts.Perennials should be dug up and divided every 3-4 years. This stimulates healthy new growth, encourages future blooming, and provides new plants to expand the garden or share with gardening friends. Plant Details Category: Perennial Available Colors: Yellow, White, Orange, Red Bloom Time: Summer Height Range: 6-8" (15-20cm) Space Range: 4-6" (10-15cm) Lowest Temperature: -20° to -10°F (-29° to -23°C) Plant Light: Full Sun Companion Plants: Baby's Breath, Iris, Salvia USDA Zone: 5-8

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Alpine Baby's Breath (Gypsophila cerastoides)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Mat-forming, semi-evergreen selection. Produces dainty white to lilac flowers with contrasting pink veins. Normally blooms in late spring and early summer. Uses Perfectly sized for rock gardens and border fronts. Looks great spilling over container edges. Tumbles beautifully over rocks, slopes, and banks. Plant Feed Not necessary. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Well-drained, slightly alkaline soil. Basic Care Summary Tolerates poor soil, heat, and drought. Best in well-drained, lime-enriched soil. Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Protect from excessive winter moisture. Planting Instructions Perennials can be planted anytime from spring through fall.Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller) to a depth of 12-16” (30-40cm). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients, and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or all-purpose feed that encourages blooming (for example fertilizers labeled 5-10-5).Check the plant label for suggested spacing and the mature height of the plant. Position plants so that taller plants are in the center or background of the landscape design and shorter plants in the foreground. To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Plan ahead, for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It’s best to install cages early in the spring, or at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread.Finish up with a 2” (5cm) layer of mulch such as shredded bark or compost to make the garden look tidy, reduce weeds, and retain soil moisture. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering may be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others, like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.Thoroughly soaking the ground up to 8” (20 cm) every few days is better than watering a little bit daily. Deep watering encourages roots to grow further into the ground resulting in a sturdier plant with more drought tolerance.To check for soil moisture, use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Incorporate fertilizer into the soil when preparing beds for new plants. Established plants should be fed in early spring, then again halfway through the growing season. Avoid applying fertilizer late in the growing season. This stimulates new growth that can be easily damaged by early frosts.Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Reduce the need to fertilize in general by applying a 1-2” (3-5cm) layer of mulch or compost annually. As mulch breaks down it supplies nutrients to the plants and improves the overall soil condition at the same time. Pruning Instructions Depending on the flowering habit, snip off faded blooms individually, or wait until the blooming period is over and remove entire flower stalk down to the base of the plant. Removing old flower stems keeps the plant’s energy focused on vigorous growth instead of seed production. Foliage can be pruned freely through the season to remove damaged or discolored leaves, or to maintain plant size.Do not prune plants after September 1st. Pruning stimulates tender new growth that will damage easily when the first frosts arrive. Perennial plants need time to prepare for winter, or “harden off”. Once plants have died to the ground they are easy to clean up by simply cutting back to about 4” (10cm) above the ground.The flowering plumes and foliage of ornamental grasses create a beautiful feature in the winter landscape. Leave the entire plant for the winter and cut it back to the ground in early spring, just before new growth starts.Perennials should be dug up and divided every 3-4 years. This stimulates healthy new growth, encourages future blooming, and provides new plants to expand the garden or share with gardening friends. Plant Details Category: Perennial Available Colors: White Bloom Time: Late spring to summer Height Range: 2-3" (5-8cm) Space Range: 4-6" (10-15cm) Lowest Temperature: -20° to -10°F (-29° to -23°C) Plant Light: Full Sun Companion Plants: Lavender, Ornamental Grass, Campanula USDA Zone: 5-8

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Aloe Shrub (Aloe vera)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Aloe vera are known as Medicinal Aloe for the burn soothing gel within their fleshy leaves. A carefree solution for hot, dry locations. Beautiful grouped with other types of succulent shrubs and Cacti to create a sculptural look in the landscape. Uses Wonderful for containers and xeriscaping. Terrific accent plants that add interesting shape to the garden. A good choice for planting along a building foundation, walls or fences. Plant Feed Apply liquid fertilizer 2 or 3 times during growing season. Watering Water every two weeks during dry weather. Soil Well-drained soil is essential. Basic Care Summary Drought tolerant and virtually carefree. During extremely dry periods water thoroughly once a week for best performance. Planting Instructions Plant in spring or early fall to give plants the best start.Choose a location that will allow roots to spread and branches to grow freely. Space plants far enough from building foundations, walls, and decks so that the growing foliage won't crowd the structure. Consider whether tall trees or shrubs will block windows or interfere with the roof or power lines.To prepare the planting area dig a hole as deep as the root ball and three times as wide. After removing the soil, mix it with some compost or peat moss. This enriches the soil and loosens the existing dirt so that new roots can spread easily.To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot. The container can also be removed by carefully cutting it down the side.Set the plant in the hole. If the root ball is wrapped in burlap fabric this must now be removed along with any string or wire securing the burlap. If roots are tightly packed gently rake them apart with your fingers.Return the soil to the planting area packing it firmly around the root ball. Fill the hole until the soil line is just at the base of the plant, where the roots begin to flare out from the main stem.Water the plant well then add a 2” (5cm) layer of mulch, such as shredded bark, around the planting area. Keep the mulch at least 4” (10cm) away from the trunk of the plant as this can keep the bark too moist and cause it to decay. Watering Instructions Depending on rainfall, new plants need to be watered weekly through the first growing season. A slow, one-hour trickle of water should do the job. During hot spells thoroughly soaking the ground up to 8” (20 cm) every few days is better than watering a little bit daily. Deep watering encourages roots to grow further into the ground resulting in a sturdier plant with more drought tolerance.To check for soil moisture use your finger or a hand trowel to dig a small hole and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water.Monitor new plants through the first two years to make sure they are getting the moisture they need. After that they should be sturdy enough to survive on their own. Fertilizing Instructions Established trees should be fertilized every 2-3 years. Feed in early spring when plants start growing.Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product designed for trees and shrubs, or go with a nutritionally balanced, general-purpose formula such as 10-10-10.Always follow the fertilizer package directions for application rates and scheduling. Over-fertilizing plants or applying at the wrong time during the growing season can result in plant injury. Pruning Instructions Pruning may be needed to remove dead branches, encourage bushier growth, promote more flowers, or maintain a specific size or shape. Plant Details Category: Nursery Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Summer Height Range: 2-3' (0.6-0.9m) Space Range: 2-4' (0.6-1.2m) Lowest Temperature: 20° to 30°F (-7° to -1°C) Plant Light: Full Sun Companion Plants: Kalanchoe, Texas Sage, Ice Plant USDA Zone: 9-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Alocasia, Elephant's Ear (Alocasia species)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Easy-care plants add a tropical touch to the landscape. Worth growing for beautiful foliage alone. Boldly accents other selections. These unique plants are sure to attract attention! Uses Beautiful in shady borders and woodland gardens. Especially nice in waterside gardens. Makes a breathtaking potted specimen plant. Plant Feed Fertilize regularly for best display. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil Fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary A heat tolerant selection. Best in fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil. Keep soil moist, watering freely in dry weather. Wear gloves when handling to avoid skin irritation. Planting Instructions Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or a balanced all-purpose feed (for example fertilizers labeled 12-12-12).Check the plant label for suggested spacing. Crowding plants can result in fewer blooms and weak growth as the plants compete for light. Exceptions to this might be regions with a short growing season, shade plantings which tend to grow slower and fill in less quickly, or a need to fill an area with color quickly such as for a special event or if planning to entertain guests outdoors.Remove the plant from the container. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Vining annuals require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering can be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.To check for soil moisture use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can actually damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants. Pruning Instructions Prune plants freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Pinching plants back stimulates dense, bushy new growth and encourages more flowers.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). Their flowers are not very showy and any buds should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Annual Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 2-6' (0.6-1.8m) Space Range: 2-4' (0.6-1.2m) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 50°F (4° to 10°C) Plant Light: Part Shade Companion Plants: Canna, New Zealand Flax, Blue Marguerite USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Agave Indoors (Agave species)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Rosette of long, gray-green succulent foliage is a stylish accent plant for any sunny situation. Spiny edges add interest and texture. A low-maintenance selection, perfect for beginners or anyone seeking a great-looking, sculpture-like plant that doesn’t a lot of work. Native to Mexico. Uses A carefree houseplant for a sunny location or in a container outdoors during warm weather. A wonderful easy-care gift plant! Plant Feed Apply liquid fertilizer 2 or 3 times during growing season. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Cactus/succulent mix. Basic Care Summary Prefers very well drained soil. Allow soil to dry moderately between waterings. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil for Cacti and Succulents. That will ensure that the soil is sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix. If you choose to make your own soil mix, combine equal parts sand and general purpose potting soil.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a hole in the center of the soil large enough to hold the root ball of the plant.If the plant is spiny be sure to wear gloves for protection. Rubber gloves should be fine if handling small-spined plants but if the plant has long or sharp needles, leather gloves offer more protection.Small plants may be safely moved using kitchen tongs. For moving larger plants, a good method is to wrap the plant with paper towel or tissue paper. For exceptionally large or spiny plants follow with a layer of newspaper or wrapping paper for extra protection. Wrap gently, not too tight, so as not to crush the spines. Tape the outer layer of paper closed at several points to hold snug. Once the plant is moved to its new pot and secure, then the wrappings can be carefully removed.Remove the plant from its pot. Place it in the planting hole and press soil firmly around the roots, just covering the root ball. For spiny plants, use a stick, spatula, or other utensil to move the soil and to keep distance between your hands and the spines.Repot every 2 years. Unless the roots are pot-bound the same container can be used. If a larger pot is needed choose one not more than 1-2” (3-5cm) larger in diameter than the existing pot. Watering Instructions Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the plant. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Discard any excess water that has accumulated in the pot’s saucer.Don’t water again until the top 1-2” (3-5cm) of soil is completely dry. Check the soil moisture with your finger. Plant may require less water during the winter months when it’s growing more slowly because of lower light levels. Some species may even go dormant for a few months in winter. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for cactus and succulent plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long.A general-purpose fertilizer for house plants can be used for feeding cacti or succulents but it must be diluted to one quarter the strength of the normal rate. Pruning Instructions Cactus and succulent plants can be pruned to remove dead or damaged parts or to maintain a specific size or shape. Pruning encourages new growth, branching, and provides plant pieces that can be used for propagating more plants. Keeping the plant trimmed also encourages more side-shoots and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Depending on the growth habit of the plant: long succulent leaves can be cut back to the base of the plant. Side stems can be cut back to the main trunk. If trimming to shape, cut off smaller segments just above a joint.Baby cacti that grow on the main plant are known as “pups”. They can get very thick on some types of cacti. Pups can be cut off with a sharp knife at a 45-degree angle. Allow the cut area on the pups to air dry until a callous forms and they can be set in moist sand to root and eventually form new plants.Some cacti and succulents produce “offsets”. These are plants that grow next to the mother plant by short rhizomes. These can be cut off at the rhizome and used to start new plants just like pups. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 1-2' (0.3-0.6m) Space Range: 2-3' (0.6-0.9m) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Succulents, Kalanchoe, Desert Rose USDA Zone: 10-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

African Lily Indoors (Agapanthus species)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions  Features Agapanthus is Native to South Africa. The tall vertical flower stems are topped by a lush cluster of blooms. Brings a distinctive architectural style to the interior and a refreshing tropical feeling. Plant in the garden when flowers have faded and this perennial plant will bring years of seasonal beauty to the landscape. Uses Tall stems are ideal for a centerpiece on a large dinner or buffet table. May be displayed outdoors in warmer weather. A beautiful, easy-care gift plant! Plant Feed Every four weeks with mild liquid fertilizer. Watering Keep soil moist throughout growth and bloom season. Soil All-purpose mix. Basic Care Summary Plant in organic-rich, well-drained soil. Keep soil moist throughout growth and bloom season. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Remove faded flowers for best display. Planting Instructions If the plant was purchased in a pot, then it is probably already in a quality potting soil and requires little more than watering and grooming for a while.If potting a flowering plant to bring indoors or to give as a gift plant, start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in bright location for best performance.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Most potted flowering plants prefer consistently moist but well-drained soil. If the soil gets too dry the blooms can wilt and they may not recover. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. Follow the product directions for proper timing and application rates. Pruning Instructions Remove the flowers as they fade. This keeps the plant looking tidy and may encourage more blooms depending on the type of plant. After flowering many blooming plants make attractive houseplants. Be sure to trim the foliage to maintain the desired size and shape. Occasional trimming encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Some plants will re-bloom on their own, but others may have very specific day-length or temperature requirements to flower again. A bit of research may be necessary to determine what is needed to encourage future blooming. Some plants, such as bulbs or perennials, can be turned into wonderful garden additions after the flowers have been enjoyed indoors Plant Details Category: Flowering Houseplant Available Colors: Lavender blue Bloom Time: Spring and summer Height Range: 2-3' (0.6-0.9m) Space Range: 15-18" (38-46cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Oriental Lily, Tropicals, Calla USDA Zone: 6-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Basil 'Italian Large-Leaf' (Ocimum basilicum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions  Features The large, tasty leaves of this variety are very popular for flavoring Italian cuisine. Snip fresh leaves and use them to flavor tomato dishes, breads, caprese salad and of course, pesto. This Basil is nice when planted in a pot by itself or when mixed with other herbs or annuals in the landscape. Grow it in a sunny windowsill to perfume your home and provide easy access to the flavorful leaves. Try adding a few leaves to sandwiches or using them as a wrap for freshly cut tomatoes. Yum! Uses Culinary herb for gardens and containers. Excellent for flavoring a variety of dishes. Use leaves fresh, or dry and keep in an airtight container. Wash fruits, vegetables and herbs thoroughly before eating. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Keep well-watered. Soil Light, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Very easy to grow in virtually any location. Does best in light, well-drained soil. Keep soil moist, watering freely in dry weather. Harvest foliage as needed. Planting Instructions Annual herbs can be planted in the garden in spring. Annual herbs are also ideal for containers. Pots can be brought indoors for the winter and placed near a sunny window for harvesting through the cold months. Return the plants outdoors in the spring when the danger of frost is past, or simply replace with fresh plantsPrepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller) to a depth of 12-16” (30-40cm). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients, and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy.Check the plant label for suggested spacing and the mature height of the plant. Position plants so that taller plants are in the center or background of the landscape design and shorter plants in the foreground. To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake apart the lower roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Finish up with a 2” (5cm) layer of mulch such as shredded bark or compost to make the garden look tidy, reduce weeds, and retain soil moisture.If planting the herbs in a container, start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot or pack. Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering may be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others, like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Thoroughly soaking the ground up to 8” (20 cm) every few days is better than watering a little bit daily. Deep watering encourages roots to grow further into the ground resulting in a sturdier plant with more drought tolerance.To check for soil moisture, use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water.Plants in containers can dry out quickly, depending on the weather, and may need water more frequently than plants in the garden bed. Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Herbs planted in the garden don’t require additional fertilizer. Apply a 1-2” (3-5cm) layer of mulch or compost. As mulch breaks down it supplies nutrients to the plants and improves the overall soil condition at the same time.Herbs in containers can be fed lightly with a general purpose fertilizer at half the rate suggested on the package directions. Pruning Instructions Invest in a good, sharp hand pruner or knife for harvesting. Pinching the stems off can cause damage to the main plant.Herbs can be harvested throughout the growing season to be used fresh, dried, or frozen. It’s best not to prune more than 50% of the foliage at one time. This keeps the plant healthy and producing new growth for continuous harvesting.Unless you are growing an herb specifically for its flowers (such as lavender), or seed production (such as fennel), it is best to remove flower buds as they appear. This keeps the plant’s energy focused on foliage production instead of blooms and seeds.Harvest herbs in the morning, when the plant oils are at their peak. Prepare herb cuttings for use by gently washing and drying the foliage. If planning to preserve the herbs, check foliage for insects or eggs as well. Herbs can be dried or frozen for future use. The general rule for use in cooking is: use twice as much fresh or frozen herb as compared to dried herb.Harvest seeds when the flowers start to fade and turn brown, but before the seeds fall from the plant. Plant Details Category: Herb Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Late summer Height Range: 18-24" (46-61cm) Space Range: 12-15" (30-38cm) Lowest Temperature: 20° to 30°F (-7° to -1°C) Plant Light: Full Sun Companion Plants: Sage, Tomato, Pepper, Oregano, Thyme USDA Zone: 9-11

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Patio Lemon Tree (Citrus limon)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions  Features Patio lemons produce the same fruits as landscape lemon trees but with the portability of a potted plant. That means the tree can be conveniently located by a door, on a patio, deck, or even a balcony. Place where the sweetly scented flowers can be enjoyed and the fruits can be easily picked. Potted trees are perfect for defining spaces to create privacy, add a dimension of height among other patio planters, or simply bringing a big-landscape feeling to small spaces. Uses A great plant for large patio containers where the fragrant flowers can be enjoyed and the fruit easily picked. A pair looks beautiful placed on either side of a gate or entranceway. Can also be grown indoors if space and ample sunlight can be provided. Plant Feed Apply slow release fertilizer for citrus trees in the spring. Watering Keep well-watered. Soil Fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Locate the tree away from the shade of larger trees or buildings. Place it where the branches will be accessible from all sides so fruit can be easily harvested as it matures. Best in fertile, well-drained soil. Keep soil moist, watering freely in dry weather. Remove fast-growing suckers that sprout from the root area around the main trunk. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot or pack. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, gently grasp the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start.Plan ahead for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It's best to install cages at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a small trellis that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions Plants in containers can dry out quickly, depending on the weather, and may need water more frequently than plants in the garden bed. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). The flowers are not particularly attractive so any buds that appear should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Container Available Colors: Grown for fruit Bloom Time: Grown for fruit Height Range: 6-10' (1.8-3m) Space Range: 3-6' (0.9-1.8m) Lowest Temperature: 20° to 30°F (-7° to -1°C) Plant Light: Full Sun Companion Plants: Hibiscus, Orange, Lime USDA Zone: 9-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Vinca (Catharanthus roseus)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions  Features Glossy foliage and simple, bright blooms look spectacular all summer long. A perennial in its native Madagascar, Catharanthus is popular for annual plantings and can also be used as a houseplant. Available varieties offer a choice of overall plant size and a nice selection of bloom colors. Uses Wonderful for borders, beds, window boxes and containers. Plant Feed Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Fertile, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Very easy to grow in virtually any location. Best in fertile, well-drained soil. Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Remove faded flowers for best display. Planting Instructions Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or a balanced all-purpose feed (for example fertilizers labeled 12-12-12).Check the plant label for suggested spacing. Crowding plants can result in fewer blooms and weak growth as the plants compete for light. Exceptions to this might be regions with a short growing season, shade plantings which tend to grow slower and fill in less quickly, or a need to fill an area with color quickly such as for a special event or if planning to entertain guests outdoors.Remove the plant from the container. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Vining annuals require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering can be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.To check for soil moisture use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can actually damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants. Pruning Instructions Prune plants freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Pinching plants back stimulates dense, bushy new growth and encourages more flowers.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). Their flowers are not very showy and any buds should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Annual Available Colors: Flowers in shades of pink, white, purple, red, lavender, and bicolor Bloom Time: Summer Height Range: 6-12" (15-30cm) Space Range: 8-12" (20-30cm) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 50°F (4° to 10°C) Plant Light: Sun to Part Shade Companion Plants: Dracaena Spikes, Lobelia, Dusty Miller USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Calibrachoa (Calibrachoa Hybrid)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions  Features Blooms resembling miniature petunias cover an abundance of trailing stems in a lush and colorful display. A tender perennial most commonly grown as an annual. Easy care and heat tolerant. Many botanical authorities consider Calibrachoa to belong to the genus petunia. Uses Perfect for all kinds of containers, including window boxes, hanging baskets and combination planters. Looks great in rock gardens. Plant Feed Every two weeks with mild liquid fertilizer. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil Fertile, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary A heat tolerant selection. Best in fertile, well-drained soil. Water as needed to keep soil evenly moist, especially in hot weather. Remove faded flowers for best display. Planting Instructions Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or a balanced all-purpose feed (for example fertilizers labeled 12-12-12).Check the plant label for suggested spacing. Crowding plants can result in fewer blooms and weak growth as the plants compete for light. Exceptions to this might be regions with a short growing season, shade plantings which tend to grow slower and fill in less quickly, or a need to fill an area with color quickly such as for a special event or if planning to entertain guests outdoors.Remove the plant from the container. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Vining annuals require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering can be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.To check for soil moisture use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can actually damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants. Pruning Instructions Prune plants freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Pinching plants back stimulates dense, bushy new growth and encourages more flowers.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). Their flowers are not very showy and any buds should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Annual Available Colors: Flowers in shades of red, orange, pink, purple, white, apricot, yellow, and blue Bloom Time: Summer Height Range: 4-8" (10-20cm) Space Range: 9-12" (23-30cm) Lowest Temperature: 30° to 40°F (-1° to 4°C) Plant Light: Full Sun Companion Plants: Sweet Potato Vine, Blue Marguerite, Bidens USDA Zone: 10-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Bonsai

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions  Features More than any other houseplant, Bonsai "bring the outdoors in" with their skillful miniature recreations of landscapes and ancient trees. You can almost feel the breezes blowing and hear the leaves rustling! Uses Very decorative on a small table or windowsill. Can be placed outside to enjoy on the deck or patio during warm weather. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Water as needed to keep soil evenly moist, up to twice a week if plant is in bright light. Soil Gritty, sharply drained soil. Basic Care Summary Keep soil evenly moist and fertilize regularly. Trim as needed to maintain size and shape. Mist daily during active growth. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 8-20" (20-51cm) Space Range: 8-10" (20-25cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Bright Light Companion Plants: Ivy, African Violet, Azalea USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Curly Spider Plant 'Bonnie' (Chlorophytum comosum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Bonnie has all of the great carefree features of the standard Spider Plant but with a bit of artistic flair. The foliage, and especially the “baby” spider plants, are a swirl of curly leaves and variegated color. A real beauty that adds a relaxed feeling and decorator touch indoors or outside, on a porch, patio or deck. Uses Easy to grow indoors or outdoors in pots or beds. Looks great grown in containers and hanging baskets. Wonderful for combination plantings. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Ordinary, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Plant in ordinary, well-drained soil. Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during active growth. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Green and white Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 6-8" (15-20cm) Space Range: 8-10" (20-25cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Gerbera Daisy, Sansevieria USDA Zone: 10-12

by web developer | 06 July, 2020 |

Spider Plant Indoors (Chlorophytum comosum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features One of the most carefree plants around! Spider Plants easily adapt to indoor conditions and the soft, gently arched blades of foliage add a lush, relaxed feeling to any room. The perfect choice for bringing the vitality of nature indoors. Uses Easy to grow indoors or outdoors in pots or beds. Looks great grown in containers and hanging baskets. Wonderful for combination plantings. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Allow soil to dry between thorough waterings. Soil Ordinary, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Plant in ordinary, well-drained soil. Water thoroughly but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during active growth. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Green and white Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 6-8" (15-20cm) Space Range: 8-10" (20-25cm) Lowest Temperature: 50° to 80°F (10° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Aglaonema, Gerbera Daisy, Sansevieria USDA Zone: 10-12

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |

Heart-Leaf Philodendron 'Brasil' (Philodendron hederaceum)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features ‘Brasil’ offers a colorful twist on a plant that has been a houseplant favorite for generations. That’s because heart-Leaf Philodendrons are some of the easiest tropical plants to grow indoors. They tolerate all kinds of neglect including low light, poor soil and inconsistent watering. This is a great first-time houseplant or gift plant and it’s perfect for anyone who wants to enjoy the natural beauty of plants without a lot of maintenance. Uses Perfect for all kinds of containers. Small types are very decorative on a small table or in a hanging basket. Larger species provide a bold tropical accent indoors or on a porch, deck, or patio during warm weather. Plant Feed Once every month during growing season. Watering Water every 5 to 7 days depending on light and temperature. Keep soil evenly moist, but not soggy. Soil All-purpose potting mix. Basic Care Summary Keep soil evenly moist. Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer monthly during active growth. Dust or wipe off leaves for best display. Planting Instructions Start with a good quality, commercial potting soil. These are usually lighter in weight than topsoil, sterile and pest-free. Many are available with a mild starter fertilizer in the mix.Select a container with a drainage hole or be prepared to drill holes for drainage if there are none.Prepare the container by filling with potting soil up to 2” (5cm) from the rim of the planter. Remove the plant from its pot.Make a small hole in the soil slightly larger than the root ball either by hand or using a trowel. Insert the plant into the hole and press soil firmly around the roots and just covering the root ball. When all the plants are potted, water thoroughly to settle the soil and give plants a good start. Place plant in a reliably sunny location.Repot every 2 years in the same container or in a container slightly larger than the diameter of the roots. Watering Instructions Prefers moist but well-drained soil. Check the soil moisture with your finger. If the top 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, or plants are wilted, it is time to water.Apply water at the soil level if possible to avoid wetting the foliage. Water the entire soil area until water runs out the base of the pot. This indicates that the soil is thoroughly wet. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed for foliage plants.Too much fertilizer can damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants.Slow-release fertilizers are an especially good, care-free choice for container plants. A single application can often provide plants with the proper level of nutrition all season long. Pruning Instructions Most container plants can be pruned freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Keeping the foliage trimmed also keeps the plants looking neat and tidy, encourages the plant to develop more side-shoots and flowers, and reduces the demand for the plant to develop a larger root system. This is important since the roots are in a confined space. Plant Details Category: Houseplants Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 6-36" (15-91cm) Space Range: 12-36" (30-91cm) Lowest Temperature: 60° to 80°F (16° to 27°C) Plant Light: Medium Light Companion Plants: Spathiphyllum, Calathea, Alocasia USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |

Dracaena Florida Beauty

Dracaena surculosa Common Names: Golddust Dracaena, Spoted-Leaf Dracaena, Japanese Bamboo, Gold Dust Plant Family: Asparagaceae Synonymous: Dracaena godseffiana Distribution and habitat: Dracaena surculosa is a native of western tropical Africa rainforest region. Description: Dracaena surculosa is a slow growing, cespitose, evergreen plant, with thin erect stems, winding or hanging at times that grow about 60cm (23 inch) high with a spread of 38cm (15 inch). Branch profusely and bear whorls of  two or three opposite, elliptic leaves with pointed apex, 8cm (3inch) long and 4cm (1.5 inch) wide on thin but wiry stems. The leaves are dark green spotted with cream. New leaves appear as tightly rolled cones, unfurling to show beautiful creamy yellow markings. The inflorescences are 7-8cm  (2.75-3 inch) long with small white flowers, pleasantly fragrant during the night; the fruits are globose berries of about 15 mm of diameter of a reddish orange colour. Houseplant care: Dracaena surculosa is a small plant that can be grown in a bottle garden, though it is tolerant of drier indoors conditions. The bamboo-like canes, is very hardy and accepts both heavy pruning and neglect. Remove discolored leaves to keep it tidy. Give them an occasional shower on their foliage to remove dust. A trim along old stems is recommended to rejuvenate growth. Prune erect stems when there are one too many at various desired heights (new growth will readily emerge at cut levels) for a lovely aesthetic and ornamental display. Light: Dracaena surculosa need bright light, but should not be placed in direct sunlight. Good light will help keeping strong leaves variegation.Outdoors, Dracaena surculosa can handle a few hours of direct sun, even. Temperature: For Dracaena surculosa the temperature should be moderate in summer with a minimum of 10°C (50°F) in winter. Provide the plant with some humidity by standing the pot on a tray with moist pebbles and by mist-spraying occasionally, but avoid over-watering the leaves. Cooler conditions for only a week or two are not fatal. The growth will be restored as soon as the temperatures rise above 18°C. Water: During the active growth period (from early summer till autumn) water Dracaena surculosa moderately to keep the potting mixture moist, but never sodden. During the rest of the year water it only enough to prevent the compost from drying out. Fertilising: Give a liquid fertiliser once a fortnight during the summer. Potting and repotting: Pot on Dracaena surculosa in spring every other year, using a well-drained soil-based potting mixture. Dracaena surculosa remain relatively small and do not need frequent repotting to sustain the growth. It will thrive for years in quite small pots and will attain maturity in 12cm (5 inch) pots. It likes to be potbound, so do not repot it in an over-sized one. Propagation: Dracaena surculosa can be propagated from tip cuttings taken with three or four leaves attached. Insert the tip cuttings in 8cm (3inch) pots filled with moistened rooting mixture consisting of equal parts peat and sand. Enclose the pots in a plastic bag and keep them in a temperature of 21-24°C (70-75°F) in partially shaded positions. Alternatively can be used a heated propagator case. No additional water will be needed for four to six weeks. After rooting has occurred, remove the pot for plastic bag or propagator and begin to water the new plant moderately, moistening the potting mixture at each watering and allowing the top centimetre (0.4 inch) or so of the mixture to dry out before watering again. In addition apply half-strength liquid fertiliser at fortnightly intervals. When roots appear on the surface of the mixture, move the young plant into a pot one size larger containing the standard potting mixture used for adult plants and treat them as mature Dracaena surculosa. Dracaena surculosa can be also propagated through division when repotting. Problems:Stunted growth may be caused by root mealy bugs; check for evidence around the roots.Treatment: Use an appropriate pesticide.  Place granule of a synthetic pesticide in the potting mixture. During the next month examine plants weekly for traces of re-infestation. Avoid overwatering.The soil must be draining, in order to avoid rottenness due to water stagnation. If it is placed in a poorly luminous or rather cool position, then it is better to reduce the watering. Too dark or too sunny positions will usually cause leaf drop. Recommended varieties:Dracaena surculosa ‘Florida Beauty’ has leaves so densely spotted that many of the blotches merge to form a solid creamy white area. Dracaena surculosa ‘Kellery’ has ticker leaves. Uses: Dracaena surculosa is an ideal houseplant for cooler areas where will be thrive in warm spot free from droughts. In warmer areas grow outdoors in a sheltered spot. It has a stunning variegated foliage that sparkles among a crowd of greeneries. It is ideal as an attractive specimen in homes, offices, shopping malls, etc. as it is tolerant of low light conditions. Outdoors in the garden, it is suitable as a standalone shrub or mass-planted as a back of border or bedding plant in sunny or semi-shaded sites or used in informal hedges and landscaping. Excellent too for container gardening, located at patio, deck, porch or courtyard as a specimen or with a crowd of other foliage plants. It is simply fabulous for small-sized garden where plants are mostly container-grown. Its beautiful variegated foliage are popularly used as fillers to add interest, sparkle and beauty in floral arrangements. Toxicity: The plant and its fruits are poisonous to many animals, including cats and dogs. SUMMARY: CHARACTERISTICS:Foliage – variegatedShape – uprightHeight: 60cm (23 inch) PROPER CARE:Watering in rest period – moderatelyWatering in active growth period – plentifullyLight – bright filteredTemperature in rest period – min 18°C max 24°C (64-75°F)Temperature in active growth period – min 18°C max 24°C (64-75°F)Humidity – high Hardiness zone: 9a-11

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |

Caladium (Caladium bicolor)

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Large, heart-shaped leaves in a variety of colors. Great accent plant that adds a tropical feel to any setting. This low-maintenance selection requires little attention. Uses The perfect choice for beds and borders. Makes a breathtaking potted specimen plant. Wonderful for combination plantings. Plant Feed Every two weeks with mild liquid fertilizer. Watering Keep soil evenly moist. Soil Fertile, well-drained soil. Basic Care Summary Best in fertile, well-drained soil. Water as needed to keep soil evenly moist, especially in hot weather. To enjoy next year, store tubers (roots) in a frost-free location in winter. Planting Instructions Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or a balanced all-purpose feed (for example fertilizers labeled 12-12-12).Check the plant label for suggested spacing. Crowding plants can result in fewer blooms and weak growth as the plants compete for light. Exceptions to this might be regions with a short growing season, shade plantings which tend to grow slower and fill in less quickly, or a need to fill an area with color quickly such as for a special event or if planning to entertain guests outdoors.Remove the plant from the container. If plants are in a pack, gently squeeze the outside of the individual plant cell while tipping container to the side. If plant doesn't loosen, continue pressing on the outside of the container while gently grasping the base of the plant and tugging carefully so as not to crush or break the stem until the plant is released. If the plant is in a pot, brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Vining annuals require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering can be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.To check for soil moisture use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Too much fertilizer can actually damage plants so it’s important to follow the package directions to determine how much, and how often, to feed plants. Pruning Instructions Prune plants freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Pinching plants back stimulates dense, bushy new growth and encourages more flowers.Remove old flowers to keep plant looking healthy and prevent seed production that drains the plant’s energy at the expense of forming new flowers.Some plants are grown only for their attractive foliage (such as coleus, dusty miller and flowering kale). Their flowers are not very showy and any buds should be pinched off to keep the foliage looking its best. Plant Details Category: Annual Available Colors: Grown for foliage Bloom Time: Grown for foliage Height Range: 12-24" (30-61cm) Space Range: 12-24" (30-61cm)) Lowest Temperature: 40° to 50°F (4° to 10°C) Plant Light: Part Shade to Shade Companion Plants: Sweet Potato Vine, Begonia, Coleus USDA Zone: 11-12

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |

Tillandsia Streptophylla

Tillandsia Streptophylla As there are over 650 species of Tillandsia air plants, you have a vast variety to choose from for your home decor. Air plants are easy to care for and do not root to the soil for moisture and nutrients. People are often unable to tell the difference between different varieties of air plant. Many assume that all air plants need the same care. Even in the stores, you find little help with your unique species of air plant. This article will teach you everything about one of the most interesting species; Tillandsia Streptophylla. Tillandsia Streptophylla is the Queen of air plants. It is a xeric tillandsia, which means it grows in drier conditions. This species is native to Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico and thrives in warm regions. When Streptophylla needs water, the leaves curl back to form tight ringlets. You can buy a Tillandsia Streptophylla here. What is a Tillandsia Streptophylla? Tillandsia Streptophylla is also known as Shirley Temple because of its curly ringlet leaves. It grows in warmer regions, usually at elevation. The leaves of the plant are pastel green in color. Instead of the edges of the leaves curling closer to each other, the leaves curl back into tighter ringlets when they need water. They grow 6-8 inches tall and grow a beautiful pink florescence covered with trichomes. The size of the florescence ranges from 4 to 12 inches when it has completely opened up. Since it grows in warm and dry regions, it requires low to moderate watering and little maintenance. Scientific Name The scientific name of this species of air plant is Tillandsia Streptophylla Scheidweiler ex E. Morren. As mentioned above, its commonly known as Shirley Temple. Scientific Classification It is a species of the genus Tillandsia and belongs to the family of Bromeliaceae. Flower During the blooming period, the plant’s center turns a beautiful pink color. Because of this, it is also called the blushing plant. It has pink inflorescence with purple tube flowers. The flowering bracts grow straight up from the center of the plant and can attract hummingbirds. The trichrome covered florescence grows from 4 to 12 inches. The large inflorescence has many bracts and its flowers. Since it requires little care or maintenance, it can bloom indoors as well with appropriate exposure to light. Tillandsia Streptophylla Care Plant care is one of the most important responsibilities of a plant parent. Tillandsia Streptophylla tends to ease many aspects of plant care and maintenance. It is an easy air plant and even beginners can find it very easy to care for Tillandsia Streptophylla. It needs infrequent watering since it grows at elevation. It can tolerate being outside in mild temperatures. It can also do with direct sunlight for a couple of hours every day. Check out our favorite air plant care tools here. Following are some of the important aspects of Tillandsia Streptophylla care: Water The watering needs of air plants vary with their natural surroundings and habitat. If you keep them in an area with high moisture in the air, you only need to mist the plants. If the area is especially dry, you will have to soak or dunk the plant in water for a few hours twice or three times a week. You will find varying instructions about watering Tillandsia Streptophylla. The basic instructions about watering range from misting to dunking. These air plants are bulbous air plants, which means they are hollow at the fat bulbous bottom. Excess water sometimes collects in this base, which causes the air plant to rot. We recommend not soaking the plant. However, if you live in a very dry and humid area, you can soak it for 10 minutes once a week. Make sure to dry it and drain the excess water trapped between the leaves. You can use the misting method for the plant 2-3 times a week. It absorbs water through the trichomes on the leaves. Mist each of the leaves with water. The condition of the plant will also guide you with its watering needs. When the leaves are straight, the plant is hydrated. When the leaves curl back into ringlets, it is a sign that the plant is dehydrated and needs watering. The last important tip about watering Tillandsia Streptophylla is to dry the plant. It must be completely dried after watering, or the trapped water causes fungus growth and plant rot. Put the plant in indirect sunlight and a well-ventilated place so that it dries. Also, hold the plant upside down and shake it a bit so that the trapped water runs out from between the leaves. Light Although Tillandsia Streptophylla can bask in direct sunlight for a few hours, it’s best to give the plant indirect sunlight. Excess amount of direct sunlight can develop burn marks on the plant. It thrives well indoors and will also bloom indoors. Temperature The appropriate range of temperature for Tillandsia Streptophylla is 50-95 degrees Fahrenheit. A warm environment is most appropriate for this species. It also needs good air circulation and some humidity as well. Fertilizer You can fertilize Tillandsia Streptophylla about once a month. Feed your plant with fertilizer by mixing it with water to help the plant absorb the nutrients. How to Identify Tillandsia Branchycaulos Tillandsia Streptophylla is a type of air plants that can be identified by its curly, irregular shape. It has thick pastel green-colored leaves. The edges of the leaves curl out towards the base and form ringlets when dehydrated. The plants look a lot like little Tillandsia Xerographica. When blooming, the leaves at the center start blushing. The plant grows a pink fluorescence with many bracts. It grows many flowers that are mauve in color. Display of Tillandsia Streptophylla There are many ways to display Tillandsia Streptophylla. Mount them in a seashell Attach them to driftwood Paint a rock and make an air plant stand with wire They can be displayed in a glass container as well. There are many creative ways to display your Tillandsia Streptophylla that show off your green thumb. Here are some more of the ways to display Tillandsia Streptophylla: Terrariums A sealed or an open glass container, like a terrarium, is a very creative way to display air plants. You can add pebbles, seashells and moss to the container to give it a more natural touch. Terrariums can also be displayed in many ways to enhance your living space. Terrariums with Tillandsia Streptophylla can be placed on tabletops, shelves or other furniture. They can also be suspended in the air. Aeriums Aeriums can be another creative way to display your queen of air plants. Aeriums, like terrariums, are glass containers for décor, but like the name suggests, they encourage more air circulation. You can display your Tillandsia Streptophylla species in an aerium with a bed of sand, pebbles or moss.You can find many creative ways to display these aeriums anywhere in the room. Mounting It is very simple and creative to mount Tillandsia Streptophylla on different mounting objects. Air plants are especially known for their ability to attach to most surfaces they are mounted on. You can use different mounting objects like rocks, seashells, driftwood or any other display object. ou can use a strong adhesive or a wire to mount the plant on a mounting object. However, you must be mindful of the mounting material you are going to use for your Tillandsia species because different types of materials tend to rot or are prone to fungus, which can harm the plant. You can display your air plant with the display object on a tabletop or anywhere in the room. Check out our favorite terrariums, aeriums, and displays here. Conclusion Tillandsia Streptophylla is a very interesting species and can be a treasure for those who love having a collection of air plants. The leaves of this air plant dramatically curl into ringlets, indicating that it needs water. With appropriate watering, the leaves stretch out and remain straight. Although Tillandsia Streptophylla is well known for its low maintenance, this species runs a high risk of rotting. Therefore, it is important that this plant is completely dried within 4 hours of watering. Ensure there is no trapped water between the leaves for a happy and healthy air plant.

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |

Perennials Assorted

Plant Details Basic Care Instructions Detailed Care Instructions Features Perennials offer a wide variety of sizes, shapes and colors. Dependable color and texture looks great all season. Easy to grow and very rewarding. Uses Makes a dependable mixed border plant. Perfect for all kinds of containers. Excellent for planting along fences and walls. Plant Feed Slow release feed in spring. Watering Water regularly until established. Soil Adapts to most soil types. Basic Care Summary Very easy to grow in virtually any location. Water regularly until established. Mulch annually to protect roots. Apply a slow-release fertilizer in spring. Planting Instructions Perennials can be planted anytime from spring through fall.Prepare the garden by breaking up the existing soil (use a hoe, spade, or power tiller) to a depth of 12-16” (30-40cm). Add organic matter such as manure, peat moss or garden compost until the soil is loose and easy to work. Organic ingredients improve drainage, add nutrients, and encourage earthworms and other organisms that help keep soil healthy. Give plants an extra boost by adding a granulated starter fertilizer or all-purpose feed that encourages blooming (for example fertilizers labeled 5-10-5).Check the plant label for suggested spacing and the mature height of the plant. Position plants so that taller plants are in the center or background of the landscape design and shorter plants in the foreground. To remove the plant from the container, gently brace the base of the plant, tip it sideways and tap the outside of the pot to loosen. Rotate the container and continue to tap, loosening the soil until the plant pulls smoothly from the pot.Dig the hole up to two times larger than the root ball and deep enough that the plant will be at the same level in the ground as the soil level in the container. Grasping the plant at the top of the root ball, use your finger to lightly rake the roots apart. This is especially important if the roots are dense and have filled up the container. Set the plant in the hole.Push the soil gently around the roots filling in empty space around the root ball. Firm the soil down around the plant by hand, tamping with the flat side of a small trowel, or even by pressing down on the soil by foot. The soil covering the planting hole should be even with the surrounding soil, or up to one inch higher than the top of the root ball. New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks to get them well established.Plan ahead, for plants that get tall and require staking or support cages. It’s best to install cages early in the spring, or at planting time, before the foliage gets bushy. Vining plants require vertical space to grow, so provide a trellis, fence, wall or other structure that allows the plant to grow freely and spread.Finish up with a 2” (5cm) layer of mulch such as shredded bark or compost to make the garden look tidy, reduce weeds, and retain soil moisture. Watering Instructions New plantings should be watered daily for a couple of weeks. After that, depending on the weather and soil type, watering may be adjusted to every two or three days. Clay soils hold moisture longer than sandy soils, so expect to water more frequently in sandy settings.Different plants have different water needs. Some plants prefer staying on the dry side, others, like to be consistently moist. Refer to the plant label to check a plant’s specific requirements.Ideally water should only be applied to the root zone - an area roughly 6-12” (15-30cm) from the base of the plant, not the entire plant. A soaker hose is a great investment for keeping plants healthy and reducing water lost through evaporation. Hand watering using a watering wand with a sprinkler head attached is also a good way to control watering. If the garden area is large, and a sprinkler is necessary, try to water in the morning so that plant foliage has time to dry through the day. Moist foliage encourages disease and mold that can weaken or damage plants.Thoroughly soaking the ground up to 8” (20 cm) every few days is better than watering a little bit daily. Deep watering encourages roots to grow further into the ground resulting in a sturdier plant with more drought tolerance.To check for soil moisture, use your finger or a small trowel to dig in and examine the soil. If the first 2-4” (5-10cm) of soil is dry, it is time to water. Fertilizing Instructions Incorporate fertilizer into the soil when preparing beds for new plants. Established plants should be fed in early spring, then again halfway through the growing season. Avoid applying fertilizer late in the growing season. This stimulates new growth that can be easily damaged by early frosts.Fertilizers are available in many forms: granulated, slow-release, liquid feeds, organic or synthetic. Determine which application method is best for the situation and select a product with a nutritional balance designed to encourage blooming (such as 5-10-5).Reduce the need to fertilize in general by applying a 1-2” (3-5cm) layer of mulch or compost annually. As mulch breaks down it supplies nutrients to the plants and improves the overall soil condition at the same time. Pruning Instructions Depending on the flowering habit, snip off faded blooms individually, or wait until the blooming period is over and remove entire flower stalk down to the base of the plant. Removing old flower stems keeps the plant’s energy focused on vigorous growth instead of seed production. Foliage can be pruned freely through the season to remove damaged or discolored leaves, or to maintain plant size.Do not prune plants after September 1st. Pruning stimulates tender new growth that will damage easily when the first frosts arrive. Perennial plants need time to prepare for winter, or “harden off”. Once plants have died to the ground they are easy to clean up by simply cutting back to about 4” (10cm) above the ground.The flowering plumes and foliage of ornamental grasses create a beautiful feature in the winter landscape. Leave the entire plant for the winter and cut it back to the ground in early spring, just before new growth starts.Perennials should be dug up and divided every 3-4 years. This stimulates healthy new growth, encourages future blooming, and provides new plants to expand the garden or share with gardening friends. Plant Details Category: Perennial Available Colors: Assorted Bloom Time: Spring and summer Height Range: 6-48" (15-122cm) Space Range: 8-36" (20-91cm) Lowest Temperature: -10° to 0°F (-23° to -18°C) Plant Light: Sun to Shade Companion Plants: Combine mounding, trailing and upright forms for a pleasing display. USDA Zone: 6-8

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |

Cryptanthus, Pink

Cryptanthus or Earth Stars   Cryptanthus is a genus of plants found in the Bromeliaceae family. Cryptanthus bromeliads are unique in that they only grow terrestrially as opposed to many other bromeliads that can grow mounted on a substrate. The genus get its name from the Greek word meaning hidden flower.  Cryptanthus are more commonly known as Earth Stars, a name they received because of the shape of their foliage. With over 1,200 different varieties, Cryptanthus have incredibly varied and beautiful foliage ranging from dark green and variegated to bright reds and pinks to silvery stripes. Most Cryptanthus grow close to the ground and can be as small as three inches in height. However, there are some species of Cryptanthus that can grow as tall as three feet. Earth Stars are endemic to South America. More specifically, they can be found growing on Brazil’s rain forest floors. Unlike many other bromeliads, they grow in the soil.  The canopies under which they grow, allows diffused sunlight through. Because of their adaptations to this environment, Cryptanthus have special care considerations. Potting As opposed to other bromeliads that have very small root systems which only act as anchors, Cryptanthus has a more developed root system. Its roots can be expected to grow to at least the same width as its foliage. While their root systems are larger. a five or six inch pot should still provide adequate space for the plant to grow. Using plastic pots will help maintain moisture. It is wise to use a pot that is wider than it is deep. Earth Stars will thrive when potted in a medium that maintains some moisture. Specialty potting mixes are available at garden centers and nurseries. You can also mix your own with sand, peat and perlite. Humidity Consider keeping your Earth Star in an area of the house that remains humid. Kitchens and bathrooms, for example, are generally more humid than other areas of the home.  To increase humidity, you can fill a shallow tray with pebbles and water or you can run a humidifier near your plant.  Areas where other houseplants are kept will also have higher humidity. Fertilizer In order to maximize growth, Cryptanthus should be fertilized. Cryptanthus will thrive on any balanced fertilizer such as 10-10-10 or 14-14-14.  It is important, however, to significantly dilute the solution down to a quarter of the strength recommended. This highly diluted solution can be used every time you water. The Cryptanthus Society recommends using a time release granular fertilizer when first planting pups. Pups Like most bromeliads, Cryptanthus only flower once during their lifetime. Almost all Cryptanthus have small, delicate white flowers near their leaves. Sometime before it dies, a healthy plant will produce pups, exact clones of the mother plant, that can be removed and then potted in their own growing medium. Depending on the variety of Cryptanthus, the pups can be found either at the end of stolons, at a leaf axis, or at the base of the plant. Pups should be allowed to grow attached until they are roughly 1/3 to 1/2 the size of the mother plant after which they can be removed and potted. You may have to stake the pup until it develops sufficient roots to hold itself up. Temperature Cryptanthus can survive in a wide range of temperatures but they thrive in temperatures between 60 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. They are ideal for indoor growth but can also grow well outdoors in many moderate climates. Mulching when the weather becomes colder can protect the roots during the winter and allow the plant to produce offsets. The plant can also survive warmer temperatures, upwards of 100 degrees Fahrenheit as long as it is kept moist by humidifiers, manually misting water onto the plants, or is located outdoors in a humid environment. Light Cryptanthus varieties require differing amounts of lights. Most Cryptanthus prefer indirect sunlight. Shade from tall trees outdoors or a sunny room without direct sun exposure is ideal for Cryptanthus. As mentioned above, Cryptanthus are adapted to survive under the cover of trees in humid climates. Too much direct sun can cause bleached or sunburned areas on the plant’s leaves. If your plant seems stressed and these marks appear, move your bromeliad to a spot with less direct sunlight. On the other hand, if your plant does not get enough light it will begin to look light green in color. Troubleshooting Cryptanthus experience few pests, but like all bromeliads they are most susceptible to mealybugs and scale. Mealybugs, a type of scale, look like small cottony masses. They can usually be controlled through manual removal or swabbing with rubbing alcohol. In outdoor environments, natural predators such as ladybugs and parasitic wasps should keep mealybug and scale infestations under control. If manual removal does not improve the situation, chemical insecticides can be used. See your local county extension agent for recommendations on the safest products for both people and the plants. Varieties Because Cryptanthus thrive in humidity and many varieties are lower growing, they are ideal for use in terrariums. Cryptanthus bivittatus is a beautiful rose and purple colored plant that grows no taller than 8 inches high. This variety would be an excellent and colorful addition to a terrarium. There are many varieties of Cryptanthus with vast differences in appearance. Understanding the names of bromeliads can help you determine what a particular species of Cryptanthus will look like. The South East Michigan Bromeliad Society defines the following terms: bivittatus    -having two stripes coriaceus    -leather-like lacerdae      -tattered latifolius      -wide leaved marginatus  -having margins zonatus        -having zones, i.e. bands LEAF COLOR:  aurantiacus -orange carnosus -pink (i.e. meat-colored) fuscus- dark, dusky viridis -green. GROWTH HABIT: acaulis -stemless bromelioides -like a bromelia, scaposus -having ascape sinuosus -sinuous, winding Other species may be named for specific people. Tips to Remember Cryptanthus generally make excellent houseplants. Remember to keep the plant moist and in humid conditions. This is especially important when you use central heat or air conditioning as the moving air has a tendency to be drier. Many Cryptanthus can also tolerate outdoor conditions in temperate climates. Remember to mulch for protection during the winter and expect some damage to the leaves if temperatures drop below freezing. Fertilize your Earth Star to encourage growth, repot pups, and continue enjoying your Cryptanthus for years to come!

by web developer | 04 July, 2020 |